How do you remove rust (iron) from your water?

How do you remove rust (iron) from your water?
Posted in: Iron Removal
By Mark Timmons
More from this author

How do you remove rust (iron) from your water?

A WATER SOFTENER CAN REDUCE IRON TO BELOW THE THRESHOLD OF STAINING, BUT IT CAN NOT TOTALLY REMOVE IT! Under some circumstances, a water softener will work for a while, but the resin bed will gradually become fouled with iron over months or years, decreasing it’s efficiency at removing the iron. To totally remove iron, one must utilize the following:(1) Oxidation and filtration; or (2) Sequestration using polyphosphates. POLYPHOSPHATES - We will discuss sequestration of iron with polyphosphates first. Sequestration of iron with polyphosphates does not remove it from the water supply, but keeps the iron in solution, so that it does not produce stains. This is often used when individuals or businesses want to keep the iron from staining in irrigation systems. It is accomplished by injecting a small amount of polyphosphate into the water, typically with a chemical injection pump and a solution tank containing a supply of polyphosphate. However, it is not perfect in removing iron, as evaporation of the water can still leave an iron residue and the iron often precipitates when the water is heated. Results may very dramatically with sequestration, depending upon a variety of factors, not the least of which is water chemistry. OXIDATION - Almost any concentration of iron can be oxidized by feeding an oxidizer such as chlorine, ozone, potasium permanganate, hydrogen peroxide or even oxygen into the water supply. The oxidizer reduces the iron to a small particle (precipitate), which is then mechanically filtered from the water, typically by a backwashing filter with a dense media containing carbon or materials. In my thirty-plus years of experience, I have personally tried every method known to man to remove iron. Today, I primarily tried use hydrogen peroxide, as it is a much better oxidizer of iron than either chlorine or potassium permanganate and does not leave excess air in the water like oxygen systems. Unlike chlorine, hydrogen peroxide is simply hydrogen and oxygen and produces no harmful chlorination byproducts. A hydrogen peroxide system consists of a chemical injection pump, solution tank, in-line static mixer, and a backwashing filter to remove the oxidized iron. I prefer the hydrogen peroxide system because it completely removes iron and sulfur with totally predictable results. It is my opinion that other methods are not as predictable or reliable in function. A hydrogen peroxide system will remove 100% of the iron. PERIOD! For homebuilders that build large custom homes with irrigation systems on iron-bearing waters, the hydrogen peroxide system will totally eliminate any staining in irrigation systems, and throughout the home, for that matter. Additionally, a water softener will not have to work nearly as hard once the iron is completely removed. This is not to say that other methods can’t work. I am just stating my opinion based upon my extensive experience in treating problem water.
September 11, 2007
Comments
Josie
November 27, 2007 at 2:12 PM
We would like to treat our well with hydrogen peroxide, and not just filter it at the house. Does anyone know how much we would need to add to the well to do this?
mark
December 1, 2007 at 12:54 PM
If you are using 7% H2O2, use 1 gallon per 100 feet of well depth. If you are using 35% (be careful) and use 1 quart per 100 foot of well depth.
Daniel W. Tanner
December 25, 2007 at 3:09 PM
Where do I get this ind of system? How much does it cost? How much does it cost to operate? I think your article is very good.
mark
December 25, 2007 at 5:50 PM
US WATER SYSTEMS sells this product. Go to https://www.uswatersystems.com
Arthur
January 27, 2008 at 11:23 PM
Can Mark (or someone) give me more complete instructions about adding Peroxide to well water to eliminate iron? How long do you leave the Peroxide in the well? Should I flush it directly outside, or let the water go through the house? Is there any danger to septic systems? Etc.? Thanks.
mark
February 4, 2008 at 8:46 AM
Arthur, I would not really recommend "dumping" H2O2 into the well. You can "shock" chlorinate a well, but Hydrogen Peroxide needs to be fed on a continual basis.
Arthur
February 4, 2008 at 5:25 PM
Mark, I'm a bit confused. You write that you wouldn't recommend dumping H2O2 into a well, but you seemed to be recommending it in your Dec 1 letter, above. In any case, if that's a bad idea, how do you shock chlorinate a well? How long do you leave the Chlorine in the well? Should I flush it directly outside, or let the water go through the house? Is there any danger to septic systems? Etc.? Thanks again.
Arthur
February 4, 2008 at 5:50 PM
Mark, Arthur again. I just found a lot of instruction on "shock chlorination." The thing is, I have a lot of iron in my well, but I don't think I have bacteria. No smell, just brown colour and grit from time to time. Any suggestions? Thanks.
Mark
February 4, 2008 at 8:04 PM
Arthur, Hydrogen Peroxide needs to be injected into a mixing chamber just ahead of your pressure tank. A peristaltic pump is used to inject it from a container of the H2O2. It immediately oxidizes the iron, manganese and sulfur ,which is then removed with a backwashing filter containing Centaur catalytic carbon. This system does a great job of eradicating the iron. If you want to "shock" chlorinate a well, you should use a chlorine disinfection kiy such as the one found here: http://tinyurl.com/3by58f Follow the manufacturers' directions and it should be fine to doe on an occasional basis (once or twice a year). Shock chlorination is only a temporary fix and you shouldn't run any more chlorine than necessary into your septic tank. If you need to do so, flush some extra septic tank "bacteria" down the toilet to compensate.
John
February 17, 2008 at 4:18 PM
Mark, Thank you for the wonderful article. I am looking in to some possible solutions for getting the iron out of our water. I currently have a Softener and use Rustbuster Salt which does help, but nonetheless, we have a lot of iron in our system and thus in our fixtures. I went to the website you referenced - US Water Systems and looked at a H2O2 system (approx $1000). My question is, generally, how much does this system cost to run? Ie: I currently have to put in about $40 of salt in my softener every 2-3 months; how much H2O2 does this system take? I am really open to getting something if it will take care of the rust problem we have, but at the same time, I don't want to pay that much money and then discover that it takes another $600/year to run/upkeep the system. Are there resources for purchasing H2O2 that are more economic vs the US Water Systems site? Thanks in advance for any info you can help with. John
mark
March 22, 2008 at 7:48 PM
Our average customer spends $350/yr on H2O2, but if you buy the peroxide direct from a chemical company you can save a great deal of money. You typically buy 35% and cut it 4 to 1 with RO or distilled water. Be careful and follow all safety precautions with the 35%.
Greg
April 30, 2008 at 2:55 PM
Mark, What about filtration without oxidation for removing lower levels of iron? What are the pros and cons of simple filtration? Thanks.
Jeff Stratton
August 8, 2008 at 1:55 PM
I just put in a well system for irrigation only, the PH is 6.7 and the Iron is a 15.8 MG/L. Will your Hydrogen Peroxide system that consists of a chemical injector pump, solution tank, in-line static mixer, and a backwashing filter work with this amount of iron? Would I need to add soda ash to increase the PH for it to work properly? Would one backwashing filter work to remove all the iron or would I need two. Jeff
mark
August 9, 2008 at 9:36 AM
Greg asked: <em>What about filtration without oxidation for removing lower levels of iron? What are the pros and cons of simple filtration?</em> Greg, In order to remove even some of the iron, it would require a filter with a .35 or lower micron rating and you would probably have to change it every day. It's just not practical or cost effective. Additionally, it would not remove all the iron.
mark
August 9, 2008 at 9:40 AM
Jeff asked: <em>I just put in a well system for irrigation only, the PH is 6.7 and the Iron is a 15.8 MG/L. Will your Hydrogen Peroxide system that consists of a chemical injector pump, solution tank, in-line static mixer, and a backwashing filter work with this amount of iron? Would I need to add soda ash to increase the PH for it to work properly? Would one backwashing filter work to remove all the iron or would I need two.</em> Jeff, You should not have to adjust the pH and I would recommend using two backwashing filters. The water flows through the first filter and then into the second. This gives longer contact time for filtration, ensures that you are using filtered water (even during backwashing of one tank) and results in overall better performance. When it comes times to change the Centaur media (usually around 5 years), you simply change the media in the first tank and switch the second tank to the number one tank position, putting the re-bedded tank in the number two position.
AJ
September 10, 2008 at 9:53 AM
WHat aout the Pyrolox system? does it work for iron removal? will the iron preipitate in the hot water heater?
Elizabeth Gillette
September 15, 2008 at 9:56 PM
Water Doctor, where have you been all my life? We live in rural SW Minnesota and have terrible well water. We have a Culligan softner but still struggled with our blond hair turning orange along with our appliances. When Culligan would test our water they said it was fine. IT WAS NOT FINE. A local farmer introduced us to peroxide that we inject into our water lines before it enters our softner. It made a world of difference, however, our Culligan man says we are ruining his softner and RO drinking system by doing this. He claims peroxide is only meant for hog buildings. We don't know if we should continue with the peroxide, drill a new well, or ditch Culligan? Any suggestions? thank you.
mark
September 19, 2008 at 10:06 AM
Do you have a backwashing filter before the water softener? For the H2O2 system to work properly, you must have a catalytic carbon backwashing filter. You can find them here: https://www.uswatersystems.com/fusion-backwashing-catalytic-carbon-superfilter.html I guess we have a lot of humans masquerading as "hogs."
Monica Ward
October 14, 2008 at 4:39 PM
Dear Water Doctor: Thank you for posting your expertise for those of us trying to manage our iron heavy water. Our water is corroding our plumbing fixtures and we would like to avoid constant replacement. Our plumber suggests we call a well specialist, but I wanted to contact you to educate ourselves before the bill comes! I have inferred from all the previous emails that we will need to use peroxide in conjunction with a water softener (for which we do not own). Truly, the only issue we have with the water is the corrosion of the well pump (5 years) and corrosion of a pressure tank (also 5 years). I am concerned about using a water softener as I do not want to overburden my septic. It's a fine balance! I guess I am looking for guidance on where to start, I would like to go in the right direction and fix the problem once! Thanks.
mark
October 18, 2008 at 5:52 PM
What do you mean by corrossion? I suspect you are talking about something other than low pH. You would NOT use hydrogen peroxide with a water softener. You would use it with a backwashing filter and then could use a water softener to soften if necessary. I would need more information, but with a softener you would use less detergent, chlorine, chemicals and the like which is also very bad on your septic tank.
Jeff Stratton
October 20, 2008 at 3:50 PM
I have a irrigation system that is supplied by well water. I have iron at 15.8 ppm with a Ph of 6.7. Do you have any recommendations on how to best remove the iron. The water is only used for irrigation. The pump is a 3/4hp and is down approximately 48'. It can produces anywhere from 3 - 16 gpm. All my zones are set up for 10 gpm which is the recommended gpm from the pump manufacturer. At 10 gpm, I have a psi out of the ground of between 72 - 80. Any info would be help full. Thanks Jeff Stratton
Jeff Stratton
October 20, 2008 at 4:16 PM
What type of backwashing filter do you recommend?
mark
October 20, 2008 at 4:20 PM
Jeff, How many gallons does it use a day? In what part of the country are you located? Typically, I recommend ththe OxiGen system located here: https://www.uswatersystems.com/residential/ironsulfurremoval.html A pellet chlorinator is also an option. You can call me at 800-608-USWATER to discuss options.
matt
October 21, 2008 at 8:13 AM
i have learned alot from reading above. i have a iron rich well here in the hill country of texas and other than using iron out and regular pellets, i've done nothing to help my softener except a carbon pre-filter. my real question is two part; i have a whirlpool r.o. and i'd like to know if H2O2 will ruin the membrane and also, do you have any idea of the amount of H20 that is dripping down into my p-trap daily? if these questions can be answered, i do appreciate it. Thanks matt
matt
October 21, 2008 at 11:53 PM
why have i not recieved a response yet?
mark
October 22, 2008 at 8:17 AM
Matt, You have not recieved a response because I don't behind my Keyboard 24/7/365 - I actually have a life! I was in Chicago yesterday at the largest Water Show in the country. Now, as to your questions: 1. The H2O2 is removed by a backwashing filter BEFORE it gets to your softener, so it can only help the performance of the RO. 2. Most RO's waste 4-5 gallons per gallon made.
Jeff Stratton
October 22, 2008 at 12:41 PM
Per your request, my systems uses about 1500-1800 gals to water the entire property. I live in New Jersey. I've read about Birm filters, but I think my PH (6.7) is to low, and Greensabd Filters. Reading info on these internet sites about cleaning the iron out of the water just gets me confused what to do. Thanks Jeff
matt
October 23, 2008 at 7:37 PM
ty 4 your answer. i apologize 4 my impatience, it is a GREAT fault of mine. i am very appreciative for your help. i will look into the idea of using H2O2 2 get rid of the rust. matt
mark
October 25, 2008 at 7:11 PM
Jeff, Hydrogen Peroxide is one way that I would recommend. You might also condider an air (oxygen) filtration system. We have extensively tested these and are going to have them on our website next week. They use no chemicals and probably would be the cheapest method. Check at wwww.uswatersystems.com next week and enter "Sanis-Air Filtration."
Larry
November 1, 2008 at 11:27 AM
I am interested in the Waterdog system. I currently have a hydrogen peroxide system and would like to eliminated the cost of the peroxide. Would the Waterdog be a good choice?
mark
November 3, 2008 at 10:28 AM
<a href="http://waterdogworks.com/documents/Iron_Hunter_HD_Diagram.pdf" rel="nofollow"> (Click on this text to see a WaterDog PDF) According to Waterdog, their patented Dissolved Oxygen Generator (D.O.G.) technology generates extremely high levels of dissolved oxygen in water. By oxidizing 100% of iron and manganese minerals in water, the WATER D.O.G. technology enables easy removal by filtration, while eliminating iron oxide and hydrogen sulfide odors. We are currently testing one on a small commercial application. So far, we are not impressed with the results. The installation had 7.5 ppm of iron and also had methane. The salesperson who sold us the Waterdog said that the methane was no problem - it’s was, as it seemed to strip away the air bubbles. We then added an areator to eliminate the methane. To date, it is still not working, but we have not given up hope. We will try a few more things and I will report back to you in the near future about our findings.</a>
mark
November 6, 2008 at 10:28 AM
<strong>WATERDOG UPDATE</strong> We changed the media in the filter tanks to Greensand Plus from Catalytic Carbon today. Let’s see what happens.
Ralph
November 7, 2008 at 12:10 AM
I want to install a filtration system to get rid of iron from our water; our pH is already 8, but we are installing a new concrete tank, which may increase the pH further. Once I oxidize the iron through a static mixer with Chlorine (or Hydrogen peroxide)then put it through a backwashing filter, will this process help to drop the pH, or will I be left with a high pH at the end of this this process.
mark
November 7, 2008 at 9:37 PM
The pH should be about the same.
mark
November 9, 2008 at 10:29 AM
<strong>WATERDOG UPDATE</strong> So far, the iron is below .3 ppm, but Waterdog says it should be 0! Hummm….
mark
November 22, 2008 at 10:29 AM
<strong>WATERDOG UPDATE:</strong> Today, the system has been on line for about two weeks. The iron reading is ZERO. The WATERDOG system seems to be working very nicely. For the record, the amount of water being treated is about 12,000 Gallons Per Day. This shall be an interesting test. If this works, the Waterdog could have excellent potential in the high-end home market. The cost is entirely “up-front” as there are no chmicals to buy and no maintenance.
alex
December 4, 2008 at 7:31 PM
Any new updates on the Waterdog? What is the cost of one of the units?
mark
December 9, 2008 at 9:55 PM
So far, it seems to be doing a great job. $4,000.00 to $8,000.00
Jeff
December 16, 2008 at 4:47 PM
Mark, Is the Sanis-Air Filtration still going forward or are you leaning towards the Water D.O.G. Jeff
mark
December 17, 2008 at 9:26 PM
Jeff, Yes, it is. We made a big decision to totally re-do our website and that is top priority right now, but if you want to call me later this week, I can talk to you about the new SanisAire syetm.
Sobia
December 19, 2008 at 12:57 AM
Dear Mark! We have a colligen water softener, we use bleach once a month,and the brime tank is also always full of salt but still we have huge rust stains on all our laundary, washbasin, bath tub, dishes anything that is exposed to water. We did call a colligen expert for tuning but of no use. I am quite frustrated with all this Can you kindly suggest any way how to eliminate rust stains as well as hard water stains from the water. Many thanks in advance Sobia
mark
December 19, 2008 at 10:32 AM
Sobia, You will need a complete water analysis before I can recommend anything. Here's the link: https://www.uswatersystems.com/catalog/ntl-watercheck-test-kit.htm
Kristy
January 7, 2009 at 10:58 PM
I read a prev post about a salesman for a water purification sysytem and offering the 5 yrs of free cleaning, and bath products. I just had the same company "Rain Soft" out at my home. He totally has me sold, but the system is $3800.00 without the RO at the kitchen sink. I am wondering if I should spend the money or just get a regular softener? This does come with a lifetime warranty also, even on electronics. Is this to good to be true? I really would like the softer skin, and hair, white clothes and no staining in my brand new house! I am so afraid of my new appliances getting trashed. Please help me make my decision.
mark
January 8, 2009 at 6:38 AM
The Fusion water softener sold on US Water Systems website is as good, probably better, than the unit in question and will save you about $3,000.00. The soap packages they give away cost about $150.00 and most people never re-order once they run out. Why? I think you know why. Rainsoft is a good product, and it is a REGULAR SOFTENER (nothing more or less), but a LIFETIME WARRANTY on electronics? Please! Water conditioners like this are sold by commissioned salespeople who routinely make 30% or more commission. If you have money to burn, buy the Rainsoft, but you won't get any better quality water.
sandy
January 9, 2009 at 3:12 PM
Mark, I have been reading your site for two days and I have loved to learn so much about water filtration solutions. Unfortunately, I am not sure how to solve my problem. I am hoping you can help! My husband and I are building a new house. We tore down his old house (1800 sq. ft.)that had 1 1/2 bath to build a new house (4000 sq. ft) that will have 4 baths. While in his old house, he had a water filtration system (CFS-220-stem and CF-1500-J)by Dupage Water Conditioning Company. The system consisted of a chlorine tank, filter tank and water softener. The house plumbing has red stains. When my husband added chlorine a slug would go through the system and we would end up feeling like we were taking a chlorine shower. Otherwise, we would smell sulfur often when we turned on the bathroom faucet. The readings Dupage took for the water test are as follows: I=2.5, H=30, SO4=300 and TDS-800. In our new house we are thinking of having the water main brought in and splitting it into three branches. One branch would go directly to spickets and sprinkler system. The second branch would go to a sediment and carbon filter and then to the kitchen faucet and ice maker. The last branch would have some other type of "whole house" system for all other uses. Here are my questions: 1. If this was your house, would you break the lines into three branches and treat each line separately? If no, what do you suggest? 2. For the kitchen faucet and ice maker, can you suggest a filtration system? 3. For the "whole house" system, can you suggest a system? I would prefer to not smell chlorine or rotten eggs in the morning!!!! Your help is GREATLY appreciated. A system that works would be a wonderful thing!
mark
January 10, 2009 at 10:21 AM
Sandy, I like how you are thinking, and we can make sure you never smell chlorine or rotten-eggs or have any rust stains, but I need to know a little more about your water. <strong>I agree with what you say about splitting your water into 3 branches and treating them differently. </strong> 1. <strong>Utility Water </strong>- used for watering and outside chores (it doesn't need to be treated as much, but you may want to have the iron and/or odor removed for outside watering and to prevent stains on the house, shrubbery and sidewalks); 2. <strong>Working Water </strong>- used for bathing, cleaning, dishwashing, laundry (this needs to be of a higher quality); and 3. <strong>Life Support Water </strong>- used for internal comsumption (should be of the highest quality). However, I can only make a recommendation <strong>IF </strong>I know what your particular water chemistry is. Here's how I can find out: <strong> https://www.uswatersystems.com/catalog/ntl-watercheck-test-kit.htm</strong> If you have your water tested like this, I can confidently make a recommendation how to properly treat it. My guess is that you spent some time and money <strong>Planning</strong> your home. You should spend some time and money to find out <strong>EXACTLY</strong> what is in your water. That way you can treat it properly. When you get that information, get back with me. Regards, Mark
sandy
January 12, 2009 at 9:11 AM
Mark, Since our house is currently under construction we do not have any way to get a water sample. Should I take a sample for my neighbors spiket? Also, unfortunately I am getting to you late in the game. We need to figure this issue out quickly. We are going to be reviewing plumbing quotes this week. Is there any way I can expedite the testing by a local person? Where would I look? Again, your help is greatly appreciated!
mark
January 12, 2009 at 2:07 PM
Sandy, If you get a sample from your neighbor's well, you will know what your neighbor's water is. However, unless you get your water from the same well, it can be dramatically different. I have seen wells 10 feet apart at the same depth and the water is as different as night and day! Some local labs do testing - you can look under Laboratories or Water Analysis and Testing. Avoid using anyone who has an interst in the outcome (such as someone who sells equipment). At minimum, you will need the following: Hardness pH Iron Sulfur Manganese Tannin TDS E-coli More would be better, but I can make a determination after that. I strongly urge you to get your water tested for at least the above contaminants. Then I can make a recommendation. If you find someone who will make a recommendation WITHOUT testing.... RUN!
sandy
January 13, 2009 at 11:42 AM
Mark, I have a chicken and egg dilemma. The water piping has not been installed. The house is still being framed. Once the main is brought into the house, the plumber will want to plumb the house. How do I by pass the filtration of the three systems and still plumb the rest of the house? Better yet, how do I get the water tested without having a water line? Do water testing companies have a way of testing a well by going down into the well with a sample cup without contaminating the sample when they bring it back up? I know these may sound like silly questions. I just want to make sure I am doing the right thing.
sandy
January 13, 2009 at 11:56 AM
Mark, I have some information on your system from the last test that was taken... Iron 2.5 ppm Hardness 30 grains Sulfur 300 ppm Tannins .5 ppm TDS 800 ppm Is this enough information to recommend a system(s)?
sandy
January 13, 2009 at 11:57 AM
Sorry...my first sentence should have read.. I have some information on our system from the last time it was tested.
mark
January 13, 2009 at 4:12 PM
Sandy, I could believe everything about you water analysis except the 300 ppm of sulfur. No way that's right! I could believe 3 ppm, maybe even 30 ppm, but not 300 ppm! The plunbing should be simple: Just tell the plumber where you want the three different types of water to go, and have them each plumbed to your mechanical room. No reason to install the water treatment equipment during the "rough-in" phase. That's the simple part. You don't want to dip the water out of the well. It really needs to run for a while in order to obtain an accurate analysis.
Neikl
January 27, 2009 at 10:56 AM
Mark, I would like your opinion on treating small amounts of sulfur (less than 1ppm)in my well.We do not have any iron problems. currently we have a 100000 grain mclean softner for hardness (80 grains), with a rented culligan system they call the "super s" to treat sulfur at .7 to 1 ppm. The above system works great how ever I would like to purchase my own sulfur system, since renting the "super s" is cost prohibitive. I've been looking at systems that use pyrolox they claim they can treat up to 4ppm sulfur. what do you think about these pyrolox systems or do you have any other reccomendations? your peroxide system seems like over kill for my purposes beside $350 a year on peroxide is close to what it cost to rent culligan "super s".
Neikl
February 6, 2009 at 10:07 AM
Mark, Somehow my last post seems to have been deleted.There are three of us in our family. I'm looking for your opinion on the most cost effective way on treating 1ppm sulfur? I would like to purchase a system soon.I am looking for minimum upkeep and resonable price. Thanx Neil
mark
February 8, 2009 at 9:21 PM
Neikl, Where do you live? That will make a difference as to what I recommend.
Neikl
February 9, 2009 at 2:49 PM
Mark Ilive in southeastern Michigan, Monroe county thanx Neil
mark
February 9, 2009 at 2:52 PM
Neil, I would still recommend the OXi system.
Neikl
February 11, 2009 at 9:31 AM
Mark, My well has a maximum flow rate of about 12gpm.Does this mean I need the oxi-3 system capable of handleing up to 13gpm. Thanx Neil
mark
February 12, 2009 at 4:21 PM
YES
Steve
February 27, 2009 at 8:38 AM
I have a well water iron level of 4.5 ppm, with a .7 ppm iron after softening. With my family of 2-4, what would the typical yearly usage of H2O2 in 7% be in gallons? I am wishing to determine roughly the operating costs for the OXI system. Do you have comments on other methods such as the iron curtain style/air oxidation systems? Thank you for your informative site!
dan
February 28, 2009 at 11:22 AM
I apologise if this question is in teh wrong place. I have a well, with a rust remover and water softner in front of it. The water softner and rust remover are about 20' away from the main drain. This 20' 4" pipe seems to be getting clogged by the runoff from these two systems to the point that when they regerate that now overflows. I have had the pipe rodded several times, first every year then every 6 months now every three months. Is there a way to clear out this pipe without having it totally torn out and replaced? Is there a way to stop this build up of what looks like rust in this pipe? It is a clay pipe.
mark
March 3, 2009 at 8:54 AM
Steve wrote: <em>I have a well water iron level of 4.5 ppm, with a .7 ppm iron after softening. With my family of 2-4, what would the typical yearly usage of H2O2 in 7% be in gallons? I am wishing to determine roughly the operating costs for the OXI system. Do you have comments on other methods such as the iron curtain style/air oxidation systems? Thank you for your informative site!</em> Steve, <strong>1. Of course you would put the Oxi system AHEAD of the softener, so it would be removing 4.5 ppm iron, but the softener could be "dialed back" on salt as it would not be taking the iron out. 2. Our "average" customer uses 50-60 gallons of H202 per year. This is the only "drawback" to the system - you have an annual H2O2 bill! 3. Air is free, but the systems that use "air" are unpredictable - It's hard (maybe impossible) to always get the right amount of air into the water. So, you usually end up with air bubbles in your water, which makes it appear cloudy, and you sometimes get too little, and the iron is not oxidized properly. You frequently get "spiting and sputtering" when you first open a faucet. They end up working about 90% of the time and during that time, you generally have cloudy water. With H2O2, we can always predict that it will work and you have none of the above issues.</strong>
mark
March 3, 2009 at 8:57 AM
Dan wrote: <em>I have a well, with a rust remover and water softner in front of it. The water softner and rust remover are about 20′ away from the main drain. This 20′ 4″ pipe seems to be getting clogged by the runoff from these two systems to the point that when they regerate that now overflows. I have had the pipe rodded several times, first every year then every 6 months now every three months. Is there a way to clear out this pipe without having it totally torn out and replaced? Is there a way to stop this build up of what looks like rust in this pipe? It is a clay pipe.</em> Dan, <strong>It sounds like you have an obstruction somewhere, which causes water to stand in the pipe. There's no way a 4" pipe should plug that quick.</strong>
Mark Wallace
March 4, 2009 at 1:24 PM
Mark, After installing the US Water Systems OxiGen Iron & Sulfur Eradication System do I need to insatll a Salt Based Conditioner as well. Thanks for the info.
Rhonda
March 12, 2009 at 1:36 PM
Thank you so much for the information you have shared. We have been trying to figure out our iron problem for years! I do not recall the ppm of iron from our previous report but I think you can answer my questions without that info. We do have a softener and now I understand that is not sufficient to remove the iron. When our water sits sometimes an orange film develops in the bottom of the container. I notice this the most in the dog's water dish and the toilets. We recently had a leak in the copper pipe that connects our pressure tank to the water softener. The pipe looked corroded. When my husband took things apart to fix the pipe, the pipe was full of that orange film, more like slick mud. He also replaced other joints in the area the were corroding. Is the orange slim in that pipe from the iron dissipating out over time or do we have another problem here? The house is 10 years old and is in the Piedmont of NC (lots of orange clay soil.) You recommend water testing from US water systems. Which do you recommend the Field Test or the NTL water check test? Can the OxiGen system be installed by a lay person? My husband is not a plumber but has always fixed all our plumbing problems. He did not install the water softener though. Can the GreenWave be installed by a lay person? Also how has the WaterDog system continued to do? I like the idea of a all-in-one type of system with very little maintenance! Rhonda
mark
March 13, 2009 at 10:17 AM
Mark Wallace asked: <em>After installing the US Water Systems OxiGen Iron & Sulfur Eradication System do I need to insatll a Salt Based Conditioner as well. </em> <strong> Mark, If your water is over 10 grains of hardness, I would suggest that or a salt-free conditioner.</strong>
mark
March 13, 2009 at 10:20 AM
Rhonda, I would recommend the NTL test - it is much more comprehensive. The WaterDog is very expensive and seems to work OK, but I would not install it unless you had a dealer closeby. The Oxi system works exceptionally well on water like that and is easy to install and maintain, as is the GreenWave.
James
March 14, 2009 at 8:36 AM
Greetings Mark I am planning to have a irrigation system put in this year and don't want the iron staining the house, sidewalk and driveway. I had my well water analyzed and it has 1ppm iron. Based on the tag on the pressure tank, I have a submersible pump at a depth of 140ft, with a capacity of 20 gpm with a horsepower of 1.5 My questions are: based on the submersible pump, would I need the OXI-5 (max flow rate at 20gpm) if I had a zone or zones running at or near 20 gpm? How many gallons can run through the Oxi Backwashing Filter before it needs to get backwashed? How many gallons of water is needed to backwash the Oxi Filter? I appreciated and look forward to your response. Thanks.
matt rousseau
March 15, 2009 at 5:13 PM
we have very bad rust and smell in our water. the softner worked ok by it self for 8yrs or so .before that we used a clorinie system form culligan i will never use asystem from them again!!! i hated it ,i was replaceing bolts , plastic pieces all the time from the clorine eating it. in the last month are softner has not benn getting the job done. looking at the h202 system but dont want to get into the whole replaceing parts thing. thanks matt
Dave
March 16, 2009 at 5:10 PM
I have looked for a long time to find someone who sounded like they knew about iron in water. Amazing blog! I have a $4500 coagulation system using alum to remove 12.5 ppm iron with a ph of 7.1 ahead of a two tank water softner. The water softner removes the alum with the iron into our septic tank. After 3 years we are starting to get an orange ring in the toilets. Still test 0.0 iron. Would the H202 system do the job and get rid of the iron and water softner? Dave
James
March 17, 2009 at 6:40 AM
Greetings Mark I am interested in the Oxi-5 system for lawn and plant irrigation use. My well water has 1ppm for iron. My questions are what is the capacity in gallons for the Oxi backwashing filter and how many gallons per min. is needed to back wash the filter? Could the hydrogen peroxided treated water cause any discoloration to brick and concrete pavers? Thanks.
mark
March 17, 2009 at 8:28 AM
James asked: <em>I am planning to have a irrigation system put in this year and don’t want the iron staining the house, sidewalk and driveway. I had my well water analyzed and it has 1ppm iron. Based on the tag on the pressure tank, I have a submersible pump at a depth of 140ft, with a capacity of 20 gpm with a horsepower of 1.5 My questions are: based on the submersible pump, would I need the OXI-5 (max flow rate at 20gpm) if I had a zone or zones running at or near 20 gpm? How many gallons can run through the Oxi Backwashing Filter before it needs to get backwashed? How many gallons of water is needed to backwash the Oxi Filter?</em> <strong>James, Sorry for the delay in responding, but we installed new servers and our e-mail was not functioning for a few days. Glitches.... In response to your question, in "high flow" situations such as this, I prefer to see a system like the OXi-5 with an additional backwashing OXi filter where it is plumbed into the first filter and then into the second filter. If you are doing irrigation at night, one filter can backwash while the other one still supplies filtered water. The system will work much better and much longer withour maintenance. The Oxi filter backwashes about 90 gallons of water - you have to do that to properly remove the iron. If you do it less and you'll get iron buildup in the media.</strong>
mark
March 17, 2009 at 8:35 AM
Matt Rousseau asked: <em>We have very bad rust and smell in our water. the softner worked ok by it self for 8yrs or so .before that we used a clorinie system form culligan i will never use asystem from them again!!! i hated it ,i was replaceing bolts , plastic pieces all the time from the clorine eating it. in the last month are softner has not benn getting the job done. looking at the h202 system but dont want to get into the whole replaceing parts thing.</em> <strong>Matt, The beauty of the H2O2 system is that IT WORKS and REQUIRES HARDLY ANY MAINTENANCE! We have been using H2O2 systems for over 15 years and have learned what makes them work best. Chlorine is very corrossive and youy can expect to have problems with injection fittings, seals, bolts and the like. Since we use a Stennet Perastaltic Pump and pump H2O2, none of these problems occur. Our systems typically run more than 5 years without maintenance!</strong>
mark
March 17, 2009 at 8:39 AM
Dave asked: <em>I have a $4500 coagulation system using alum to remove 12.5 ppm iron with a ph of 7.1 ahead of a two tank water softner. The water softner removes the alum with the iron into our septic tank. After 3 years we are starting to get an orange ring in the toilets. Still test 0.0 iron. Would the H202 system do the job and get rid of the iron and water softner?</em> <strong>Dave, I would use the OXi 5 or 6, but if the water is hard, you will still need a small softener. ALL of your iron will be removed!</strong>
sheri
March 18, 2009 at 12:03 PM
Hi Mark, I live in Western PA & I've tried your links for additional info but none have worked. Where or who would I contact in order to get one of the Oxi systems? And thank-you Mark, your information has been extremely helpful. sheri <strong>Sheri, Have you tried here? https://www.uswatersystems.com/infusion-backwashing-filter-for-iron-sulfur-and-manganese-removal.html</strong>
Julia
April 26, 2009 at 7:57 PM
I'm bookmarking this page, and trying to absorb (no pun intended) as much information as possible. My problem: West Virginia well water with rust and sulfur---particularly sulfur smelly with the hot water. I'm inviting out a local treatment company for their assessment (read: sales pitch) this Friday, and want to be as intelligent as possible in assessing their suggestions. I have a whole-house filtration system (2 omni U-25 filters, 20 mg and 5 mg), plus some kind of interesting system involving 2 large blue tanks (with equally interesting timers on them) and a salt-pellet plastic barrel prior to the hot water heater. I bought this house a few weeks ago, the water tests reveal only that there's no bacteria. Do I need a water analysis? I KNOW my problem is iron and sulfur-smell (hydrogen sulfide?). I don't mind paying (a reasonable amount) for supplies (such as Hydrogen peroxide), but I'm not mechanically-inclined, and truly need an idiot-proof (preferably a hands-off) system. I just don't want to fall for some slick sales-pitch that won't get rid of the sulfur (ideally, the iron, too, but the sulfur is my higher priority). I have faucet-filter (charcoal) and I use another charcoal filter pitcher for cooking water. Thank you for your input! Julia
George Graham
June 4, 2009 at 7:28 AM
I have an H2O2 injection system along with a softener that appeared to be working properly. Then I had a line added between the pressure tank and the softener. Since then, my H2O2 injector pump wants to run continuously. It appears to be powered/controlled from the switch that also controls the well pump. Should the injector run only when the well pump is running or is there something else that tells it when it should run? Any suggestions on what might be telling it to run non-stop? (I have turned it off for the time being...it seems to have pumped a considerable amount of H2O2 into the system). Thanks! George
mark
June 4, 2009 at 7:20 PM
George, I am not quite sure what you mean when you say you "added a line between the pressure tank and the softener." Please clarify.
Ryan
June 7, 2009 at 7:28 AM
We have a water softener and whole house carbon filter and it's clearly not enough to remove the iron in the water. We are considering the OXi system but I'd like to get a water test first. What to you recommend to get an unbiased water test? and do iron removing water softener pellets really work?
mark
June 7, 2009 at 8:42 PM
Ryan, WE offer the best unbiased test in the county, at the lowest price in the country. We have negiotiated a special rate with National Testing Labs and we pass the savings on to you. You can buy it directly from them... at a higher price. Here's the link: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html Iron removing salt pellets help remove a little iron (very little) but really don't do much. Personally, I think they are a waste of money. They contain a chemical that you can purchase as Iron Out. That is a much better way to go, but to really remove iron, it MUST be oxidized, and the Oxi system does just that.
jaimi
June 29, 2009 at 1:56 PM
Hi! I have very high iron in my well water.I have a aquapur water softner and a uv light.I still have rust in my bathrooms and rotten egg odor.I had the anode rod removed and hot water tank chlorinated but it still smells bad. For the high iron I was asked to get a comercial water softner which can cost a lot.I want to use the water for my irrigation as well so I dont know if this is the only method.I was reading about Water D.O.G will it help in a case like ours? <strong>The Water Doctor Replied: I generally do not believe it is appropriate to use just a water softener for high iron. What else is in your water? He's the first thing you should invest in: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html P.S. I have tested the Water Dog and I would not use it. Too technical of a solution to a simple problem. Get your water tested and get back to me. Then I can tell your exactly what to do.</strong>
Lynda
August 13, 2009 at 1:41 PM
I read your article on the best way to remove rust from well water is to use a hydrogen peroxide injector system and I live in Tampa, FL and would like information on whether there are any local dealers? Also, I have seen a "Metalmaster" system on the internet but it does not indicate what the "Metalmaster Media" inside the tank is made of, do you know? <strong>The Water Doctor replied:</strong> <em>We do not sell through dealers as that would add 60 to 80% more to the cost of the system. We only sell direct. We can help you areange installation, however. We sell a system that is superior to Metalmaster. Here's the link:</em>https://www.uswatersystems.com/infusion-backwashing-filter-for-iron-sulfur-and-manganese-removal.html
Sheri
October 3, 2009 at 12:40 PM
Hi We live in Rural Southwestern Ontario. We have well water and a water softener. Most of the time it has been fine but then for a while we start getting alot of rust in the tubs, toilets, sinks. After 1 shower there are stains on the walls and if I don't spray it right away after each shower with alot of stain remover chemicals it's very tough to scrub off. I was reading about the hydrogen peroxide system. Where would we get one? And would we get rid of the water softener? How much are they to purchase and get installed?
mark
October 3, 2009 at 10:33 PM
Sheri, Here's the link: https://www.uswatersystems.com/infusion-backwashing-filter-for-iron-sulfur-and-manganese-removal.html You would still need a softener if the water is hard, but it would not use nearly asuch salt.
Sandy
November 13, 2009 at 11:23 PM
Hello, We live in the western suburbs of Chicago and we have a Rainsoft water system in our home. It does not remove the rust in our water like they said it would. We have 10 children with one bathroom. (It really isn't that bad!!) I don't know that much about water treatments and I just found your website after hearing a commercial for Easywater. The system I think that you are suggesting that we use would cost just under $4,000.00 dollars. WOW!! After that, how much in hydrogen peroxide would we use a year. Also, how often does this unit regenerate? I don't know if you are familiar with Rain Soft, but those units (iron and softener) also regenerate. Even though we have a well, we are hooked up to the sewer so we get a "water bill". Thanks for your time, Sandy
mark
November 15, 2009 at 9:49 AM
Sandy, You could probably use your Rainsoft Softener and add the OXi-5 system ($2,595.00), which would use $300-$400 of peroxide a year. The iron would be eradicated and your Rainsoft would not have to work very hard to just soften the water. Here's the link: https://www.uswatersystems.com/infusion-backwashing-filter-for-iron-sulfur-and-manganese-removal.html
paul h
November 16, 2009 at 7:37 AM
Hi I'm not a water expert or anything near to what some of these people are saying on here I've got an allotment with a small brook that run through it from a long pipe that runs from a reservoir a mile or two away. There is a mass of orange soil in the alloment in the pond where the steam runs into it.The water looks clear until it starts raining heavy then you can see the orange coming through the water. I would like to keep some fish in the pond eventually and would also like to clean the pond up is there anyway of catching or filtering the iron/rust from the pipes out before it hit the pond.
mark
November 20, 2009 at 10:39 PM
Paul, I do not have enough information to even make a guess. I would need to see an analysis of the source water.
MARGE TOURVILLE
February 20, 2010 at 3:58 PM
I have rust STAINS ON A MARBLE SEAT IN MY SHOWER DUE TO THE IRON FROM MY WELL WATER. ALSO THE PORCLEIN TILES IN MY SHOWER HAVE ORANGE STAINS. I HAVE TRIED CHLORINE BLEACH BUT IT DOES NOT REMOVE THE STAIN. PLEASE ADVISE.
mark
February 24, 2010 at 9:36 PM
To remove the iron, you may need to use a product like RUST -OUT or if that doesn't work you could try 17% hydrogen peroxide or muratic acid. Try this: https://www.uswatersystems.com/pro-products-1-5-lb-rust-out-24-oz-bottle.html The best thing to do is to remove the iron BEFORE it gets to your shower. Tell me more about your water...
Esse
March 2, 2010 at 2:22 PM
Hi Mark, I am trying to find out where you purchase a hydrogen peroxide system for a well and how much does it cost. We built a new house with a well and have a lot of iron in the water. We thought about getting a softener but our water is not hard, they tested it and it was about the same as the city water except that it has a lot of iron in it and thus causes a lot of staining. From what I'm reading a regular softener will do nothing for that, but would you still recommend buying one plus using the "rust-out" with it? Thank you for the advice.
Jeff
March 5, 2010 at 5:23 PM
i used rust out in my water softner now my water has a smell to it (not a rotten egg smell) i have tried regen twice but smell still there.
mark
March 8, 2010 at 12:11 AM
Esse, Try here: https://www.uswatersystems.com/infusion-backwashing-filter-for-iron-sulfur-and-manganese-removal.html Give them (us) a call.
mark
March 8, 2010 at 12:12 AM
Jeff, You need a water test. Try this: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html and, I usually don't respond when you use a "Fake" e-mail address.
Jeff
March 9, 2010 at 5:12 PM
mark thanks for the responce please be assured that the e mail address is not fake if you had a problem i am sorry here it is again njhuntin@optonline.net
Jeff
March 9, 2010 at 5:57 PM
PS. i forgot to mention that i didnt have a odor prior to using the rust out. thanks
mark
May 17, 2010 at 10:54 PM
Craig, I always recommend an "oxidation" filter ahead of a water softener, when you have that much iron. It costs more, but it will work better. Here's what I recommend: https://www.uswatersystems.com/infusion-backwashing-filter-for-iron-sulfur-and-manganese-removal.html https://www.uswatersystems.com/matrixx-water-softener-with-smartphone-programming.html
Rose Hammond
June 7, 2010 at 2:07 PM
I have well point that uses strictly for irrigation system. I have problems with staining (Fe) my house, sidewalk and the driveway. I do not know how much ppm fe in the well water. I am a chemist myself, and I used test metals in the water for the Districtof Fl. I am no longer works there either. I read many articles in several website. I kind of like your thought using the hydrogen peroxide. Could you please give me a details about how the system could install. Thank you, Rose Hammond 813-398-6225 <strong>The Water Doctor Replied: </strong> Here's a good link to how it works: https://www.uswatersystems.com/infusion-backwashing-filter-for-iron-sulfur-and-manganese-removal.html