Does whole house reverse osmosis make sense?

Does whole house reverse osmosis make sense?
By Mark Timmons
More from this author

Does whole house reverse osmosis make sense?

The short answer is "YES" but that doesn't mean that it is for everyone.  We will consider the pros and cons of a whole-house RO system and you can decide if it is for you or not. First of all, water quality varies greatly from well water to surface water to municipal water.  Well water may have things like iron, sulfur, manganese and tannin which almost always have to be removed, especially in the case of a whole-house RO system.  Those contaminants must always be removed before the reverse osmosis process.  Let's not forget that reverse osmosis removes the largest spectrum of contaminants at the most economical cost of any water treatment process.  Essentially, a whole house reverse osmosis system will remove 98 to 99% of most contaminants including Total Dissolved Solids (TDS), sodium, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, arsenic and a plethora of other chemical and organic contaminants. One of the key ingredients to a whole house reverse osmosis system is proper per-treatment, which includes removing the iron, sulfur, manganese, tannin and other nuisance elements.  So, ahead of an RO system, it is essential that filtration or oxidation of these contaminants are accomplished.  If the water is hard, then it needs to be softened or (what I prefer) use an anti-scalant to prevent hard water build-up on the membranes.  Anti-scalant systems are gaining popularity because no water is wasted and no salt is needed. A whole house RO system consists of the aforementioned pre-treatment, the reverse osmosis system itself, an atmospheric storage tank, a re-pressurization pump, ultraviolet light or Quantum Disinfection and sometimes a calcite filter to raise the pH or add some TDS back to the water.  Here is what a city water whole-house RO system might look like:   us-water-light-duty-whole-house-reverse-osmosis-system-1-3-persons-224-uswhro-1000-0fc Who might need a whole house reverse osmosis system?  Lots of people.  It could be health related in that they may want to remove as many chemicals as possible from their water.  Many people have a sensitivity to such chemicals and therefore need a whole house RO system.  In other cases, it may be that there are contaminants in the water that create ascetic issues such as high chlorides, sodium, sulfates and others. Sometimes we see water that has TDS levels in excess of 2,000 PPM (the USEPA recommends drinking water that is below 500 PPM).  I'll grant you that the water you use to flush your toilet doesn't have to be super clean, but the amount of water used for flushing toilets in very insignificant compared to most other uses for water in your home.  Washing dishes or clothes, bathing, shampooing, shaving and cleaning in clean reverse osmosis water is a pure joy. Back in the day, people used to bathe in rainwater, which is generally absolutely soft.  When I was in Haiti a few years ago, we would wait for a heavy rainstorm and stand underneath a downspout plume just to enjoy a good shower.  With shorts on and a bar of soap, we enjoyed every second of that shower. If taking a shower in the cleanest water on the planet, without chemicals, pesticides and hardness appeals to you, then maybe you are a candidate for a whole house reverse osmosis system.  If you want to be able to drink from any faucet in the home, then maybe a whole house RO system is for you.  Maybe you just want the best water possible.  If so, a home whole house reverse osmosis  system may just be what the doctor ordered! Cheers!
July 13, 2013
Comments
Erin Berger
January 3, 2014 at 10:44 PM
Can you provide a cost estimate for the complete system profiled above? My friend is a very capable Hvac engineer who is going to do my install, mainly I am concerned with the cost of the equipment. Thanks for your article and assistance?
Mark Timmons
January 5, 2014 at 9:23 AM
Erin, Here is the link to our systems: https://www.uswatersystems.com/systems/reverse-osmosis/whole-house-reverse-osmosis-systems We have three sizes. How many in your home and how many bathrooms? They are easy to install and we are here 7 days a week for tech support.
Kay Baird
January 15, 2014 at 6:20 PM
We have a well and need to filter out bacteria. We have an under the sink reverse osmosis system for drinking. What would you suggest and cost. Thank you
Kay Baird
January 15, 2014 at 6:22 PM
2 people. 2 bathrooms
Mark Timmons
January 18, 2014 at 11:03 PM
I would suggest a full water analysis before doing anything, but likely you will want to use ultraviolet disinfection, like this: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-whole-house-professional-grade-ultraviolet-system-10-gpm.html Here is the water test I would recommend: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html
John Lindstrom
January 21, 2014 at 11:13 AM
We have a RV and we will be living in the full-time and traveling all over the US. Not knowing what kind of water we will be getting into, what would you suggest. I'm leaning towards a whole house system with a water softener. Also, do have companies that would install a system or should it be portable as space matters a lot?
Mark Timmons
January 22, 2014 at 6:02 PM
John, First of all, we have many people with RV’s come to our facility and have systems installed. We are in Indianapolis, but I have no idea where you are. We have a small, powerful softener made for RV’s: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-aquatrol-premium-metered-water-softener.html We usually use some pre-filters like this: https://www.uswatersystems.com/aquapurion-big-blue-4-5-x-20-commercial-filter-housing.html Typically, we would install this ahead of the softener with these filters: #1: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-4-5-x-20-pleated-filter-cartridge-20-micron.html #2: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-4-5-x-20-pleated-filter-cartridge-5-micron.html #3: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-radial-flow-carbon-filter-4-5-x-20-rfc-bb-20.html (city water) or https://www.uswatersystems.com/pentek-4-5-x-20-radial-flow-iron-reduction-cartridge-rffe20-bb.html (this for well water) Followed by: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-whole-house-professional-grade-ultraviolet-system-10-gpm.html and this for just at the sink for drinking: https://www.uswatersystems.com/aquapurion-plus-5-stage-reverse-osmosis-system.html Let me know if you have questions.
Kathy Feyk
February 18, 2014 at 10:43 PM
I have a well that is causing blue staining in my sinks toilets etc and also corroding my fixtures. Do you have anyone in Houston, TX to help me? Need help ASAP. Please. Thanks. I discovered my email was wrong so resent.
Mark Timmons
February 23, 2014 at 1:54 PM
No, we only sell direct, but if you get a detailed water analysis like this: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html we can probably help!
Bern
March 3, 2014 at 3:23 PM
Hello, can hard water not sure whats all in it cause hair loss. My son's hair has thinning spots in it and mines is thinning at well. I have brown reside on each shower head and on the facet on the sink. It looks nasty. Cause this cause hair loss? Thank you.
Mark Timmons
March 17, 2014 at 3:55 PM
I suppose so - you should get a detailed water test like this: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html
John Sagert
April 19, 2014 at 11:40 PM
Hi Mark, How often do you have to change out a RO membrane? I know they are pricey items. Also, how do you get rid of the white (lime??) residue that corrodes every thing and anything that is in my home? That stuff has utterly destroyed 2 hot water heaters now in only 17 years, literally rusting them in 2. And God knows how many bathroom, kitchen and outdoor fixtures I have had to replace. It does not bode well for my fish tank(s) and related equipment either. Fortunately my house is plumbed with PEX, but this does not keep the fittings from falling apart and consequently leaking. Again, fortunately all of the fittings are exposed and easily repaired. Would a RO filter economically survive such an environment? I had a under the sink system for 13 years roughly and honestly, it seemed good except the pre and post filters needed replacement way to often and cost a pretty penny. The RO membrane cost so much it was actually cheaper to replace the whole system! My water supply is a community well that is tested multiple times a year with a 200 to 400 ppm TDS, and per the state and county exceeds minimum safe use and consumption standards. I have 2 full baths and 3 persons in my home. Any advice would be appreciated! Note - I am in the market but I research extensively before I do anything. And since I just finished replacing the hot water heater (again), I am attempting to locate a good economical way to clear up the water. I currently use a whole house sediment filter that runs at 1 micron. But again - this does not remove the "hardness", just large amounts of them. Thanks! John Sagert
Mark Timmons
April 26, 2014 at 7:36 PM
John, The RO Membrane can last from 6 months to 6 years... or more, depending upon how well the water is pre-treated (i.e, softened, iron removed, etc.) You get rid of the lime with a softener or an anti-scalant. You can replace all the filters AND the membrane on our undersink RO system for $55.00 - usually once a year! A softener would be the best solution and if the water were softened, the membrane would last years, making the annual filter cost $34.95.
Maureen
July 12, 2014 at 1:05 PM
I am on well water and have a terrible sulfur smell. We have been putting hydrogen peroxide down the well, which helps with the smell for a short time. we're having to use it more and more often. We are researching what will be the best type of system for our problems. I really don't like water softners because I don't like the salt taste in my water. Can you please send me some information?
Nick
January 17, 2015 at 2:29 AM
Not to be rude, but it seems to me like Mark Timmons is a salesmen with no experience in water treatment. I know it may be to late for you guys but hopefully this will answer some other's questions. Maureen- your smell is most likely caused by iron or iron bacteria in the well water. Adding bleach or Hydrogen peroxide as you have been will help. If you don't want to do a water softener, some form of aeration would take care of the problem without chemicals. John Sagert- I figured Mark would be of some help on this and corrected you. The white you see is hardness scaling out in the form of calcium carbonate, not calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide (lime). Lime is actually used to soften water believe it or not. All you need for that is a water softener, that will also allow your 1 micron filter to operate more efficiently. An RO system is not needed in your case, but if you wanted extra pure water go for it. Bern, I haven't done any research on this, but I don't think so. My wife and Mother in law have been on hard well water their whole life and have great heads of hair. The brown residue you see is iron buildup. Kathy Feyk- the article touches on this issue, but doesn't tell you what the effects are. The blue staining is most likely due to low pH water. That is hell on copper. The calcite filter will help with that. I know because I have one! If you click on the calcite filter link you will get some useful info on this. Nick- Water Treatment Operator
Mark Timmons
January 17, 2015 at 12:09 PM
Nick, I don't think you are rude, just ignorant and arrogant! Those two are often a deadly combination. "<em>Salesman with no experience in water treatment?"</em> I don't need to re-cite my credentials, but my 42 years of experience in treating home and commercial-industrial applications speaks for itself. I have worked with the EPA and other state agencies for many years. You said <em>"adding bleach or hydrogen peroxide will help"</em>. What about the THM's formed from the bleach and while we are at it, do you have any clue that bleach has additives which are not to be used in potable water? That is very dangerous advice. Then you go on and say "<em>if you don't want to use a water softener, some form of aeration would take care of the problem without chemicals"</em> Really? Seriously? A water softener will do nothing for the smell! <strong>A water softener is not even in the equation - it does nothing for sulfur water.</strong> Aeration will handle very small amounts of sulfur, but if you have higher amounts, and also sulfur-reducing bacteria, you can make a big mess. And, while you are at it, why did you not tell Maureen that when you add aeration, you can introduce airborne contaminants (bacteria) that will also have to be dealt with. To even comment on John's water without a detailed water test shows TOTAL IGNORANCE on your part. It's like going to the Doctor and saying your stomach hurts and expecting him to prescribe a remedy without any testing. That would be felony stupid! The white could be from calcium and magnesium hardness but it could also be the result of high-alkalinity combined with pH issues, high TDS along with chlorides and sulfates, genius! That advice you gave is wrong and morally reprehensible to say nothing of being totally irresponsible! Bern's issue is also one you cannot answer because you really don't know what is in the water. Only water testing can answer that question. By the way, we lose money on the water tests - we do it as a service to customers because only an uninformed person would try and treat their water without adequate testing. On Kathy's blue staining, it can be from low pH water, but I have seen just as many on water where the PH is above 7.5. It can be a grounding or electrolysis issue and even some types of water problems can cause the blue stains. To say Calcite will solve it is also irresponsible. I almost deleted your posts, but sometimes I think it's good that consumers understand that there are lots of ignorant and unqualified people out there who try and pose as water experts. We are experienced (42+ years) and we test the water, because you can't treat something properly unless you know what is in the water and if there are any competing contaminants. We take water treatment seriously and are not some hack who just comes in and does a "drive-by shooting."
Nick
January 17, 2015 at 2:39 AM
Haha, just clicked on the water test link... buy this test for $60, BUT WAIT, there's more, if you buy the overpriced, overkill for your situation water system we recommend, THEN well apply that $60 bucks toward your purchase. Haha, come on guys
Mark Timmons
January 17, 2015 at 12:12 PM
OK Nick - tell me how it is overpriced and overkill. Tell me where you can get it cheaper and explain why it is overkill. This should be good!
Kenneth Dart
January 18, 2015 at 9:08 PM
Mark, what do you recommend in SoCal where the water is hard? I have a house with 4 bathrooms and 6 people. Should I do a whole house softener and then whole house RO? Do the RO systems waste water? If so, is there a way to capture the wasted water to use for irrigation? Ken
Mark Timmons
January 18, 2015 at 10:48 PM
<strong>Answer:</strong> Ken, that is a great question… actually several great questions. Whether you use a whole-house water softener or a RO depends upon several issues. Reverse Osmosis removes more contaminants than any other water treatment process and you do need a water softener (and carbon filter) ahead of it or an anti-scalant system. RO systems do waste water – so do toilets, sinks, dishwashers, showers and washing machines. It used to be that they wasted three gallons for every gallon made. Now, the newer efficient systems waste one gallon for every three gallons made. That means they are 75% efficient. Your washing machine, toilets and dishwasher are 0% efficient - they waste every gallon they use. You can capture the waste water and use it for irrigation if you want. We can help you design a system to do that. So, do you want RO water for the whole house? Maybe… maybe not! In most cases, I would recommend a Fusion Hybrid Softener which softens the water and also removes the chlorine and chemicals, followed by a reverse osmosis system for drinking water only. Here is what I recommend: https://www.uswatersystems.com/synergy-twin-alternating-metered-water-softener.html https://www.uswatersystems.com/aquapurion-plus-5-stage-reverse-osmosis-system.html
Kenneth Dart
January 19, 2015 at 1:25 PM
What is your opinion on whole house Carbon Filtration?
Mark Timmons
January 27, 2015 at 9:51 PM
It's great, but not the only thing you want to do.
Mark Timmons
March 1, 2015 at 9:12 PM
Thanks, we recently discussed this and plan to fix it soon.
Jerry
May 20, 2015 at 12:37 PM
I have a water softner system as I am on well water. The system was put in by a local company called Kinectico. They say it will give me city like water. Well, it doesn't and everytime I shower my skin feels dry or like it has a film on it and my wife's hair is thinning and she also has a film feel on her skin after she showers in another shower in the house and she has to always use tons of lotion afterwards. Will a whole house RO system help me? I go on vacation to TN and never have an issue with my skin at any of the cabins I stay up there? Is it just that it is a bad softner system or is it in the pipes? Thank you.
Mark Timmons
May 20, 2015 at 2:20 PM
Without knowing what the quality of water coming out of the machine is, I cannot hazard a guess. You need some hardness test strips to test the water. Test the water and let me know the results and I can make a determination. They are available in a 5-pack or 50-pack: https://www.uswatersystems.com/waterworkstm-total-hardness-testing-strips-5-pack.html https://www.uswatersystems.com/water-works-total-hardness-testing-strips-50pk-12161.html
Dave L.
June 1, 2015 at 11:20 AM
Hi Mark. I currently have quite a situation on my hands. I have a newly-built house that we were ready to close on - that is until the results from our well came back. Long story short, our results came back with the gross alpha (GAPA) at a reading of 107 - and the standard for our county is 15! The builder thought the solution was a softener system (which we had already), but the results didn't come back much lower on that test. I convinced to add an RO system, but they only added it to the kitchen sink. I am currently embroiled in a battle to get them to instal a whole house system. I've got 3 little boys under 6 and cannot chance them ingesting the water. So, here are my questions: 1) Our house has 5 bathrooms (approx. 4000 sq ft). Would the medium duty whole house system suffice? 2) We already have a 250 gallon tank and treatment system (softener with carbon filter). Does the older treatment system need to be replaced with this new RO system or does the RO system get added to the current system? 3) What is the average cost to install such a system? 4) How quickly are you able to ship the size system we would need? Thanks so much and I look forward to your help and insight into our major problem!
Mark Timmons
June 1, 2015 at 7:04 PM
Dave, First, I have to say that I would never recommend installing a whole house RO system without a pretty detailed water test such as this: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html 1. If the water is withing other parameters, then Yes, the Medium Duty RO should do it! 2. The RO system would get added to the current system. The softener and filtration is needed... maybe something more, depending upon water test. 3. The system should take 4 or 5 hours to install and it's pretty simple, but I have seen people charge $600 or $2,000. The key is get someone you can trust and who will talk to us on the phone. We are here 7 days a week. 4. We can generally ship within a week.
Donna Norred
August 21, 2015 at 1:54 PM
We have had extensive testing done on our well water. How can we get the results to you so we know what system would work with our well water?
Mark Timmons
August 21, 2015 at 3:51 PM
You can send them to support@uswatersystems.com
Traci
September 17, 2015 at 10:58 PM
First off, thanks so much for all the great information Mark! :) I had read elsewhere that RO systems remove the minerals that cause water to be hard-- but from what I'm gathering here, you're saying that the minerals in hard water need to be removed with an anti-scalant or softener prior to going through an RO system, or those minerals can damage the RO system, is this correct? Thanks so much for your help, Traci
Mark Timmons
September 17, 2015 at 11:35 PM
Unless you use an anti-scalant or water softener as pre-treatment for an RO, the hardness will create scale in the membrane and dramatically reduces it's life. If your hardness is over 5 or 6 grain per gallon (GPG) the hardness either needs to be removed by a softener or sequestered by an anti-scalant.
AD
December 25, 2015 at 3:44 PM
I have 3500 SF home with 4 bedrooms and 2 showers and 3 toilets. My current tap water TDS levels are around 350 ppm. I would like to get to close to zero and neutral pH. What kind of whole house system you recommend and at what price? Thanks!
Mark Timmons
December 26, 2015 at 9:10 PM
I would recommend the following: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-medium-duty-whole-house-reverse-osmosis-system.html - This is the RO system itself, but ahead of the system you will need the following: Carbon Filter: https://www.uswatersystems.com/fusion-whole-house-backwashing-filter-for-chloramine-10-gpm.html - 10 GPM Anti-Scalant: https://www.uswatersystems.com/stenner-anti-scalant-injection-system.html It's possible that you may have to add this afterwards to make the pH 7.0 neutral: https://www.uswatersystems.com/katalox-light-ph-booster-option.html I'm sure you will questions - let me know. We are off for the Holidays and will back in the office Monday, but if you need a callback tomorrow, let me know.
dave wdowiak
February 14, 2016 at 2:08 PM
looking for a reasonable filtration system for my city water system in the Villages in Florida. Also one for my son in South Lyon MI. His is a little more complicated. He is on a city well. He has special needs. his youngest so has brain siezoursrs that require elimination or very low amounts certain chemicals in his water. this applies to bathing as well as drinking.
Mark Timmons
February 17, 2016 at 9:02 AM
There are a couple of ways of doing that: Filtration - Removes certain chemicals: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-ultimate-dual-tank-filter-for-chlorine-chemicals-chloramine-and-fluoride-15-gpm.html Water Softener/Filter Hybrid - Softens and removes certain chemicals: https://www.uswatersystems.com/synergy-twin-alternating-metered-water-softener.html Reverse Osmosis - Removes the widest spectrum of any process: https://www.uswatersystems.com/systems/reverse-osmosis/whole-house-reverse-osmosis-systems Call one of our Certified Water Specialists at 800-608-8792 and discuss which is right for your application.
Steve
March 10, 2016 at 9:13 PM
Hi Mark I had a question for you. We are in the process of buying a house with a well and septic system. We are getting a VA Loan which requires a well water quality test. The preliminary test result came back showing the lead was high, 33.3 ppm and the EPA action level is 15 ppm. The selling realtor said they would put a whole house reverse osmosis system in place to remedy the problem. We are afraid they are going to stick some cheap POS in there just to get the test to pass and then 2 months down the road we will be stuck with a crappy failing RO system, and high lead levels in our water. Do you recommend a whole house RO system for high lead levels, and if so what else should be in place to filter out contaminants? Steve
Mark Timmons
March 10, 2016 at 11:55 PM
Yes, a whole house RO system will solve that problem, but you are correct in assuming that they will put a POS system in. We see it all the time. Give me a call tomorrow afternoon and I will help you figure out what is best. I have good gatekeepers, so just say that "<strong>Mark wants to take this call</strong>." I look forward to talking with you.
James
March 19, 2016 at 8:19 AM
My family used water which had smell bad in the nearest time so I found the water purifier and was introduced by neighbors about reverse osmosis system. Thanks for sharing!
Ray Beatty
March 29, 2016 at 5:24 PM
Hi Mark: I live near Flint Michigan where we are having the major problems with lead and contaminates in the water. I want to buy a few houses and put whole house RO systems in to make them safe for drinking and bathing and rent them out. What would you recommend?
Mark Timmons
March 29, 2016 at 6:15 PM
Ray, Is this on city water? How many bath rooms - how many in the family?
Anne Sandstrom
June 23, 2016 at 12:35 PM
I installed a whole house RO system and also have an additional small filter on the shower. I notice a big difference in the water quality (taste, softness). And yet I still drink bottled water. (Even though it's town water, the source is fed in part from the Aberjona River - if you've ever read the book or seen the movie "A Civil Action" you'll know where this is. Hence my paranoia.) I'd like to stop buying bottled water. I'm considering having the water tested, but am concerned that that's just a snapshot. I'm also thinking about adding a UV filter (interesting about putting it before the RO system) Or does the RO system do enough? Am I basically just paying for plastic bottles and drinking water that's equivalent to what comes out of my tap? Thanks for your thoughts.
Mark Timmons
June 30, 2016 at 2:58 PM
Anne, Since you are speaking of Chromium VI, you might be interested in a products we have: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-1-charged-membrane-filter-system-10-to-20-gpm.html It simply gives an added layer of protection. We are using a Pulsar cartridge ahead of some of our whole house Reverse Osmosis Systems. A UV is a good idea and for years that was the only sure way to assure that your water was bacteriologically pure... UNTIL NOW! This product actually kills bacteria - UV simply renders it unable to reproduce! Here it is: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-silecte-quantum-disinfection-system.html Let me know if you have any questions.
Clint Everhart
August 17, 2016 at 11:03 AM
Hi Mark, I live in south florida on well water. I have an iron filter, softner and carbon filter. We keep having a white residue on dishes and just about anything in contact with our water. Had a couple of water system companies come out and they wanted to blame it on hard water, but our system checked out to be working fine. Their water test should a high salt content and suggested an ro system, with estimates as high as $ 10,000. We have a 2 bath house with 3 people. What system of yours would you recommend? Thanks
Mark Timmons
August 18, 2016 at 4:46 PM
If you install a RO system without more testing, there is a very high probability that it will be an unmitigated disaster. Before we can provide a solution that we can guarantee will work, we need to know many other parameters, which are in this test: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-watercheck-with-pesticides-lab-water-test.html Once we have that, we can fix your problem. We would love to recommend a system, but we would love it even more if it works! This is the first step. There is a video here that explains why testing is so important: https://www.uswatersystems.com/systems/water-testing
BSN
August 28, 2016 at 1:22 PM
Would you mind providing a functioning link to the smaller whole house unit which would be appropriate for an RV mentioned in your Jan 22, 2014 answer? How about a semi-portable, "partial-house" RV system which would be suitable for those who would like to have one RO shower but can not contemplate a whole house system? Please email if you would consider granting a water test in exchange for being featured in an article which would be read by individuals in a city/region with very severe water.
Mark Timmons
August 30, 2016 at 10:32 PM
I would need more information. Please contact me directly at mark@uswatersystems.com or call at 800-608-8792.
Jayme
September 30, 2016 at 7:31 AM
What is your experience with water Radon testing? We are purchasing a home and going through the air radon testing. In the process of researching, we've discovered it can also come into the home from water sources (dishwasher, washing machine, etc.) We do have well water. I have seen some aeration systems to mitigate it, but overall this appears to be uncommon. Is this not really an issue, or too new to know. Why aren't more water treatment companies offering mitigation? WBP has a site on it, but they're in New England. I haven't found anything in my state (Illinois). Any info would be appreciated.
Mark Timmons
October 5, 2016 at 10:18 AM
You should have your water tested for radon. Just because you have it in your air, is no indicator whatsoever you will have it in your water. In fact, it is unlikely. We do have a lab tests like this: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html but I advise getteing a water radon test done locally. If you have it, we can fix it!
Mike
November 12, 2016 at 9:29 AM
How do you protect water heaters and other metal components like faucets from corrosion with a whole home RO system? RO water is very corrosive regardless of pH.
Mark Timmons
November 14, 2016 at 9:56 PM
This statement is not always true: <em>RO water is very corrosive regardless of pH.</em> The truth is, that it depends upon what the incoming TDS is. If the incoming TDS is high, then the RO water will not be corrosive. If it is not high and appears to be corrosive we can raise the pH or add a little hardness back to the water. Most water heaters and faucets have linings which are impervious to corrosion.
Mike Fegles
January 13, 2017 at 11:05 AM
Mark - We live in a rural setting on 20 acres. Our well has good quantities but also has high levels of TDS, (1500), one of which is sodium @ 611 mg/L. Hardness is 150 and pH is 8.6. There is also a chloride level around 600 mg/L. Other measured factors are Calcium 59 mg/L; Iron 0.054 mg/L; Magnesium 0.18 mg/L; Silica 10.8 mg/L; Zinc 0.004; Fluoride 1.4 mg/L; Sulfate 160.0 mg/L; and, Turbidity of 0.1. We have been told that a R.O. system would solve the water quality problems and besides taste, corrosion is certainly one of the most aggravating problems with our water. We have replaced several plumbing fixtures in our house since building it in 2010 due to corrosion. I would hate to go to the expense of a whole house system only to find we had not solved the corrosion issue. As a side issue, we have plumbed the house for fire protection but have never yet allowed our well water to be introduced to the system for fear of corrosion ruining the fire sprinkler heads. This is another big reason we are considering a whole house R.O. system. There are only two people living here full time. My wife and I. We use less than 100 gallons a day, (around 70 - 80), but would like to size the system for a family of four should we decide to sell at some point. Can you help with some information regarding the issues I've mentioned? Thanks - Mike
Mark Timmons
January 13, 2017 at 10:03 PM
Mike, We can solve all of the problems, including corrosion. I do need to know more about your water. Do you have a more detailed water analysis?
Luis Chávez
January 21, 2017 at 10:50 PM
You guys need to fire your writers. I have a hard time taking you seriously when whoever wrote this copy doesn't understand verb-subject agreement.
Mark Timmons
January 21, 2017 at 10:53 PM
Yes, I agree. We will get professional journalists to write... who know nothing about water. You will have an enjoyable reading experience but fixing your water may be a problem. Is that OK? Is form over function what you are seeking? I am the writer. I have a college education, but I admit I am not a journalist. I do have 45 years of water treatment experience and am one of the highest certified Master Water Specialists in the USA, but if you want a journalist to treat your water then that can be arranged. The problem is: I may not write that well but he knows nothing about water... I do recall verb-subject agreement, but does the journalist know about the role of the Langelier Saturation Index or competing contaminants in treating your water? Sometimes, you can't have the whole package, but you might have to decide what is most important - Good Water or Good Grammar? Nobody has put out more water treatment content than me the past 15 years (by tenfold), so I apologize if I make a few mistakes in grammar. You get what you pay for and that's the best water treatment experts in the USA (grammar aside). #noghostwriters
Mark
January 26, 2017 at 6:26 PM
Mark, I think it is very informative and who cares about grammar. If every 10th person knew about these systems and how to instal them properly this country would ve much healthier. But people are dumb enough to buy bottled water which may be even worse than toilet water.
Drew
February 5, 2017 at 12:15 AM
What is the cost of a whole house reverse osmosis system?
Mark Timmons
February 5, 2017 at 12:12 PM
Here are our basic systems: https://www.uswatersystems.com/systems/reverse-osmosis/whole-house-reverse-osmosis-systems You would be wise to call, us and talk to a water specialist about your particular application.
Elise
March 11, 2017 at 4:39 PM
Hi Mark, I have 2 questions Is a water softener still needed with this RO System? What is the water pressure like? We already have low water pressure where we live. Wondering what a whole house RO system would do. Thanks for your time.
Mark Timmons
March 15, 2017 at 8:14 PM
<em>Is a water softener still needed with this RO System?</em> <strong>It depends upon the hardness level of your water.</strong> <em>What is the water pressure like? We already have low water pressure where we live. Wondering what a whole house RO system would do. </em> <strong> It increases your pressure as it is internally controlled.</strong>
Ginny
March 27, 2017 at 2:34 PM
Hi Mark, How do you get rid of iron and sulfur in the water? We have well water with a water softener, but the water still smells and I still have that lovely orange stain in my toilets and showers/bathtubs. Been thinking that a RO for the whole house would take care of the problem, but from what you say in your article, that is not the case. How do we remedy the issue then? Thank you for your input. Ginny
Mark Timmons
March 27, 2017 at 11:18 PM
You have to take the iron and sulfur out before a RO anyway. Here's the 100% guaranteed way to do it: https://www.uswatersystems.com/infusion-backwashing-filter-for-iron-sulfur-and-manganese-removal.html
Mario
March 29, 2017 at 10:07 PM
Hello, I have a 3900 sqft home in well. Could you tell me the system that I need. I mean the works to get the best of the best. Lolol
Mark Timmons
April 2, 2017 at 6:05 PM
I would use something like this: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-craftromaster-5000-gpd-beer-brewing-system.html Please call us for further sizing.
Jennifer
March 30, 2017 at 10:55 PM
Hi! Will a RO whole house system bring down arsenic levels without using a arsenic media?
Mark Timmons
March 31, 2017 at 9:07 AM
Yes, but we would need to have a detailed water analysis to know what other "competing" contaminants there are and other things.
Mark Timmons
March 31, 2017 at 9:09 AM
You would need a commercial-graded system similar to one of our craft beer brewing systems: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-craftromaster-7000-gpd-beer-brewing-system.html
Robert Brown
April 1, 2017 at 8:30 PM
I just reread the article and couldn't find the mistakes the grammar cop mentioned. So that search was a waste of time. But as for the most important part, the content, it was worth rereading it.
Steven Bristol
April 3, 2017 at 10:04 AM
Hey Mark, I have been trying to get a better understanding of RO systems and how they operate and some real technical information on them but information is scarce to say the least. My current system is about 19 years old, but it is still working minus some quirks. The recent problem I have run into is my booster pump failed that is feeding two 2.5x40" membranes. I believe this system is producing a lot more waste without the booster pump working which is causing my well to dry up. I have ordered an ac motor to replace it. (pump is just a 1/2 hp motor connected to a fin hosing) Another thing I would like to do is add a third membrane to my system. Would this produce more water and less waste if I had two membranes connected to the source water and the third membrane being fed off the two source membranes? I'm also thinking about changing the size tubing from 1/4" to 3/8". All of the membrane connections are being downsized. I am not sure how this would affect my pressure going in to the membranes though if it would cause a huge issue. No one around us knows RO systems or is willing to share information, everyone is asking me to spend 3500-4500 on a new system that they can just plug in. Our Water information: TDS - 1600+ PPM Chlorides - 390 PPM Flouride - 4.53 PPM Iron - 0.21 PPM pH - 8.7 Hardness - 1 grain Current Filter system: 75gallon pressure tank Carbon cartrige filter in big blue housing 5um Sediment in big blue housing 1um Sediment in big blue housing (2) 2.5x40" RO membranes 2 150 gallon storage tanks Chlorine Feeder to storage tanks 25gallon pressure tank w/ booster pump Carbon filter w/ backwash Acid neutralizer
Mark Timmons
April 7, 2017 at 11:40 AM
Steven, I would need to know a lot more about your water, like Silica levels, Langalier Index, Cation and Anion breakdown before I could answer intelligently. Our newest systems operate at 80 psi and at up to 80% recovery, so they waste only 11 gallon per every 4 gallons made, but a detailed water test is vital: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html Whether you can add another membrane depends upon the water test, the pump and motor.
Chuck Lawrence
April 14, 2017 at 1:52 AM
We have a fairly new well which produces quite a bit of water, but with hard pumping the turbidity increases to very cloudy levels. A nearby well produces very little water at the same depth, but the water is clear. When the new well was bailed during drilling, there was some mud to start with, then very fine sand, then gravels. This bailing was typical all the way to 373'. There was a problem area at about 278' where the formation collapsed twice. Welded steel casing had to be used from above the surface to the well bottom. Slotted pipe with 1/4" slots was used from about 250' to 373' since much of that formation produced water. The slots are large, but even smaller slots would not stop the very small suspended particles. This area in the well (278') seemed to be an ancient river bed with boulders, to very fine sand with silt and lots of water. At first use, the well water was slightly cloudy, but became more clear over time. Then, with heavy pumping for hours, the turbidity shot way up. The turbidity appears to be very fine particles of possibly clay, silt, and sand. The particles are so fine they stay in suspension and go right through a whole house sediment filter and right through a carbon filter. A backwashing filter was recommended, but I wonder if the suspended particles will pass right through that filter. Our thought was to only treat the water going to the house. Most of the water is used for trees and gardens. There are no close septic systems and no surface water. The static water level is 216', with some artesian pressure since the first water was found over 240' deep. What do you recommend to get rid of the particles in suspension? Water in this area of the desert does typically scale swamp coolers.
Mark Timmons
April 16, 2017 at 12:20 AM
I would try this. No guarantees, but it has a "charge" that traps the particles. There is no way to know how long it will last. It could be a long time or not! I would put a 5 and 1 micron filter ahead of it, like these: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-big-blue-4-5-x-20-dual-filtration-system.html
Jo Shedd
April 24, 2017 at 2:16 PM
We have a well which produces soft sulfur smelling water. Have heard that an injection pump for hydrogen peroxide. We think we want a reverse osmosis system. How do we go about knowing which system to get? Do you test water samples? Thanks for you assistance.
Mark Timmons
April 24, 2017 at 11:09 PM
Yes, we do. Here are the tests we recommend: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html If you have sulfur, it must be oxidized before a reverse osmosis system. Once we have the water test, we can tell you exactly what to do and guarantee the results.
Tera Crawford
June 4, 2017 at 10:54 AM
We have a well on two acres and are outside of city limits. We just tested Chromium 6 and are at 19 ppb. We have a RO system at the sink for drinking but are concerned about bathing and dishwashing. A local company came out to quote us at around $30,000 for a whole property system with a large holding tank and a leach line. He said for every gallon we use, a gallon and a half is used to wash away the contaminants. Is there an alternative to this? something cheaper and just for the house use? Watering our plants and washing our cars with filtered water is expensive and unessesary.
Mark Timmons
June 10, 2017 at 1:39 PM
You should be able to treat your water for less than a third of that! If you need whole house RO, then we have systems that waste 1 gallon for every 4 gallons they make. However, it may be possible to remove it without RO. I would need to see a detailed water test first. If you don't have one, then this is what you need: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html
Ted Janeczko
June 23, 2017 at 7:38 AM
Mark Enjoyed reading your comments on RO. I'm currently in the market looking for a whole house RO system. The only system I've seen so far is the one manufactured by Kinetico. Can you comment on Kinetico and provide any alternative systems. I live in the Wilmington, NC area. Thank You Ted
Mark Timmons
June 23, 2017 at 11:01 AM
Ted, Here are the US WAter American Revolution RO systems: https://www.uswatersystems.com/systems/reverse-osmosis/whole-house-reverse-osmosis-systems Kinetico systems are sold through dealers who pay commissioned sales people 20-30% to sell them. We sell direct, and cut-out the middlemen and offer a system with a lot more features at a lower price: Stainless Steel Membrane Housings Stainless Steel RO Pumps Uses 40% to 50% Less Energy 3-Year System Warranty #1 in Longevity Made in the USA Legendary Technical Support
Don
June 29, 2017 at 1:21 PM
Hi Mark, We have Kinetico Reverse Osmosis under kitchen sink that feeds to our refridgerator and ice maker. We would like to install a separate under-the-counter ice maker. I have heard using a completely separate (2nd R/O system) would be best for the under counter ice maker. Or even using 2 tanks to increase volume for that ice maker. I dont know how all of it woukd be installed. Any thoughts you have on this please would be great. Thank you for your time and expertise. Best Regards, Don
Mark Timmons
June 30, 2017 at 1:36 PM
Don, Many under-counter icemakers use a lot of water. I have seen some that use up to 80 GPD. First of all, you will need to find out EXACTLY what is the MOST water it can use in a 24-hour period. Then a remote-installed RO can have a dedicated line to that icemaker. This is information that is vital, but many manufacturers don't like to tell you. Let me know what you find out...
Mark Rohlfs
June 30, 2017 at 12:34 PM
We are needing a whole home system. We have had our well tested last year and they said it is high in sodium and manganese. Do you have a test that you send out for us to send back in to be sure the one we had is correct? I can send you pics of the system that was in place before and the test we had done. Not sure if any of it still works or is any good. The house was a foreclosure and we don't know anything about the system. From what I read about your company I think if you can figure out what we need. Any help you could give us would be greatly appreciated. We are currently hauling water and not using the well.
Mark Timmons
June 30, 2017 at 1:32 PM
Mark, Pictures would be great, but nothing beats a good lab test. You need one of these two first: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html If you have odor or "jellylike" substances in your toilet tank, you would use the $99 test. If not, the $49 test is all that is needed You can send photos to support@uswatersystems.com
Tom Taylor
July 3, 2017 at 11:45 PM
We need a complete system for our well the water is full of minerals very salty and close to the ocean can you give me a price on a good system large enough to look after the whole house thank you
Mark Timmons
July 4, 2017 at 10:07 AM
I can estimate such a system only if I know exactly what is in the water and at what levels. Thi si Step 1 to a successful water treatment system: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html
Rick
July 9, 2017 at 12:06 PM
Hello Mark, I must agree, the grammar Nazi might be from a different English teaching country and therefore misled. I found no issues. I have a home in SW FL and last year spent about $6K for a system by Culligan. I purchased from them believing they were among the best. today I don't have any faith in the system. I keep getting errors on the softener side control station. I have to continuously play with it to make it work. when it is in error water will not stop back washing and the water in the house is yellowed. I have opted not to purchase their over costly service plan as it appears they are only going to put in salt every other month and the cost for that is just ridiculous. Any suggestions for these last comments would be greatly appreciated. I'd love to take them to court at this point for selling us a POS system that by means of internet clearly has global issues. I am more pissed at myself for not being more thorough with my research prior to purchasing. I was thinking about whole house RO but I'm not sure if that is the way to go. Two of us live here but it is a 3br, 2ba home on a well. I am very skeptical about the water but have no idea what is in it. The salesman from culligan used a test on the counter here at home so I doubt he knows what he is talking about. What should we do at this point? What tests should we have done? Is a whole house RO system really what we need?
Mark Timmons
July 9, 2017 at 3:54 PM
Step 1: Get a detailed water test from a US EPA approved lab. Then we can talk. You won't find a better test at half this price: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html Once we know what is in the water, we can tell you how to fix it for certain.
Randy
July 20, 2017 at 11:48 PM
Mark, Looking for guidance on protecting my family. We have a 6 year old boy, and live in Wilmington, NC. I'm sure you've heard about the contaminants that DuPont/Chemours has been dumping in the Cape Fear river for the last 37 years. If not, please take a stroll down Google alley and let me know your thoughts. We are very concerned about drinking water, but also bathing, washing dishes and even watering our vegetables which we were striving to keep organic. Now to find out our drinking water has been contaminated with Teflon related chemicals is extremely disheartening. I was thinking of starting small, but honestly I want to do whatever it takes. Thoughts?
Mark Timmons
July 22, 2017 at 2:36 PM
Randy, This is a question that has popped up a lot lately and I am in the process of writing a blog on the subject (due out in the next day or two). However, there is not a lot of research on this new contaminant. Our <a href="https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-ultimate-whole-house-water-filtration-system.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Pulsar System 4</a> in initial tests has shown it is capable of removing in excess of 50% of 1,4-Dioxane and Gen-X in drinking water. However, if it were me, I would add a <a href="https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-cobalt-hyper-safe-permeate-pump-reverse-osmosis-system.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Reverse Osmosis System for Drinking </a>after that just to polish it off. Additionally, more and more families are opting for <a href="https://www.uswatersystems.com/systems/reverse-osmosis/whole-house-reverse-osmosis-systems" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Whole House Reverse Osmosis</a>.
Phil
August 3, 2017 at 11:58 AM
Mark, I live in a rural area and have a well. I am concerned about the large amount of waste water associated with a whole house RO unit. Can you install the RO unit at the well head? I already have storage tanks and house pressure pump. Can you plumb the waste water back into the well head in order to eliminate the waste? I assume the water in my well flows into and out of it and the extra TDS would flow out of the well thus avoiding concentrating the TDS in the well.
Mark Timmons
August 4, 2017 at 12:24 PM
I would not do that, because over time, you would really "concentrate" the dissolved solids. Depending upon you water supply, our Whole House RO Systems waste as little as 1 gallon of water for every 4 gallons made.
Maredith Zaviski
August 18, 2017 at 10:38 PM
Hello, My water just tested at 10.7 ppb for arsenic. I live in southeast Michigan where arse ic is a normal part of life. What are my options? Thanks so much Maredith
Mark Timmons
August 19, 2017 at 1:13 PM
Maredith, There are several options, but I would need to know a lot more about the other contaminants in you water before making a recommendation. Do you have a detailed water analysis?
Ron
September 15, 2017 at 10:24 PM
Mark, I know this is an older post, but it is valid to my situation and I have a question about whole house RO. We have decided that the municipal water currently provided requires additional whole house filtering, specifically to address poor performance of water using appliances such as the clothes washer etc. My concern is the waste water generated by the system. We currently use an average of 15K gallons per month on a municipal system that where we pay for every gallon, am I correct in stating that a whole house RO system will increase my monthly water usage to at least 30K gallons? If that is a true statement, then whole house RO, as much as I would enjoy it, would not be financially feasible. Can you recommend another system that will still reduce solids and contaminants but that is more economical to operate? We are a family of 6 in an 1800 square foot home. The house is a typical 4 bedroom 3.5 bath track home. We do use several thousand gallons for irrigation and I believe I could install the system downstream of the irrigation but I do not know the effect that would have on waste water usage. I appreciate your time.
Mark Timmons
September 16, 2017 at 1:04 PM
Ron, If you use 15,000 gallons of RO water a month, you would waste about 3,700 gallons with our low energy, high efficiency systems. That would increase you water used to less than 19,000 gallons and you could capture that waste and use it on your lawn. It would involve a tank or tanks and a re-pressurization pump. It's very do-able. If you want to discuss this further, e-mail me at support@uswatersystems.com
David
September 28, 2017 at 8:16 PM
Can these systems be installed outside?
Mark Timmons
October 3, 2017 at 12:35 PM
As long as it does not freeze and I would have some sort of roof to protect from Rain and sun,
Amanda
October 15, 2017 at 6:27 AM
I am buying a home with a well system. The water test failed because of high nitrate levels of 11.0. I would like a whole home reverse system, would this system take care of the nitrates?
Mark Timmons
October 16, 2017 at 12:13 PM
Yes, it would. Anytime you are considering a whole house RO system, you need to have a detailed water test like this: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html
Eric
October 20, 2017 at 8:38 PM
Hello Mark, I have been researching and debating whole house RO. I have a well. I like your high efficiency of only 3700 gallons of waste per 15000 gallons. Its one of the best I have seen. But I live in the desert in AZ and water is scarce. Is there any reason I couldn't route the waste water back into the well? Then it would just get diluted within the aquifer and go back to mother earth. We have TDS of around 900 ppm and high arsenic. I really don't want to waste any water if possible. In other words, I dont think RO is for me if I MUST dump the waste water.
Mark Timmons
October 21, 2017 at 9:30 AM
You have some options, but I would not recommend dumping the water back into the well as over time it would be highly concentrated. It's not a good idea to dump the concentrate back into your well. As you continue to dump the concentrated water the TDS of the will rises from 900 to 1800 to 3000 and so on. The RO won't work like that. 1. You could capture the RO Concentrate water and use it for flushing toilets and the like, maybe even bathing and washing, but it would depend upon what EXACTLY is in your water. If you don't have a good lab test, then you need to get one of these: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html 2. Another option is to use RO for a limited number of fixtures: Kitchen sink, bathroom sink, icemakers, etc. - any place where you drink water. There would be a lot less waste water that way and we can still remove the arsenic for the whole house with other technology that does not waste water: https://www.uswatersystems.com/whole-house-non-electric-arsenic-filter-by-us-water-systems.html I can advise you which is the best method if I can see a detailed laboratory water test. That's the first and most important step.
Jon DeMartino
October 24, 2017 at 4:44 PM
Thanks for all the info, I have been considering a whole house RO system for several years. We are on a well system right by the mouth of the Kennebec river in Maine. I installed a complete AquaSana Rhino system (well specific) including an iron filter but NOTHING gets the salt/sodium out. We are rebuilding and and I want to install a whole house RO system. I plan on using the AquaSana system (or at least major components) as a pre-filter. I too would like to be able to do something with the waste water and was wondering about ways to recycle it. What Whole House RO system would you recommend for a well system - if any?
Mark Timmons
October 26, 2017 at 10:46 PM
What I would need is a detailed water analysis from a US EPA approved laboratory, like this one: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html No one should attempt to recommend a whole house RO system without this type of test. Once we have the results we can answer any question you have.
Davit
November 16, 2017 at 2:02 PM
Dear Sir/Madam We are interested with water purification system can you send me price list of that systems. For our market more interested from 5 to 30 liter per hour systems. Approximate feed water conductivity is 500μS/cm - required conductivity is 10μS/cm Best regards General sales manager Davit Davtyan
Mark Timmons
November 21, 2017 at 10:43 PM
Please call us at 800-608-8792. We need a lot more information.
Marcy
January 20, 2018 at 10:50 PM
I would like a quote for a whole home water system
Mark Timmons
January 21, 2018 at 6:58 PM
We will need to know more about your water and how many bathrooms and how many in your family.
Cathy
January 25, 2018 at 2:00 PM
Who makes the most efficient whole house RO system? Here in AZ water is at a premium but the water is bad also. Can you recommend a company?
Mark Timmons
January 29, 2018 at 11:49 AM
At US Water Systems our whole house RO generally waste just 1 gallon for every 4 gallons produced and they operate at low energy (80 psi) instead of 250 psi which saves about 50% on energy and increases longivity by up to 300%. Here you go: https://www.uswatersystems.com/systems/reverse-osmosis/whole-house-reverse-osmosis-systems
Trish
February 14, 2018 at 10:06 PM
If we install a whole house RO system, are the existing chemicals still in the existing pipes? My home is 110 Years old and we have Chromium-6 in our public water. All together we want to get a whole house RO System. We also are looking for a general price for a family of 5, 1.5 bathroom house. Does the pump also control the water pressure to the house? We also have an existing water softner. Please advise..... I would like to do this ASAP 1. Will existing pipes be clear from long chemical exposure? 2. Appx cost for RO Sys 3. Does pump help with water pressure? Thank you
Mark Timmons
February 18, 2018 at 5:24 PM
Pipes don't absorb chemicals, so once you install a RO System, just chlorinate the lines and you should be good to go. The Pump delivers incredible pressure for you. Here is the system I would recommend, but we need to know more about your water: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-defender-whole-house-ro-system-up-to-3-5-baths.html
Mike Cook
March 3, 2018 at 6:44 PM
Which system would remove PFBS (similar to PFAS). It is a man-made chemical. We currently have 14/Trillion from our well water. There has been several dump sites near our home by a company who used PFAS and PFBS for treating shoes. *Whole home filter: I was thinking of doing: 1). "pre-filter" polyspun filter 2). Active Carbon Filter 3). Reverse Osmosis . (IF necessary for man-made chemicals). Our fluoride, iron, etc levels are good. It just just the PFBS that we have an issue. ANY help is appreciated. PFAS and PFBS are cancer causing man-made chemicals.
Vickie Bocanegra
March 26, 2018 at 7:02 PM
I live in AZ, we have hard water, what is better to get, a water softener system or a whole house reverse osmosis system. I've called around, have been told I'll need to buy both, do I need both?
Mark Timmons
March 26, 2018 at 7:26 PM
Well, a whole house reverse osmosis system removes the largest spectrum of contaminants of any water treatment process, but depending upon what you want to remove from your water, a whole house RO system may not be needed. At any rate, you don't need both. You are getting some bad advice.
Duane
April 4, 2018 at 7:23 PM
I have tried three dierent well water whole house systems. Non, have been satisfactor. Have a lot of tannins, fe, mg, a of course Ca co4 or some like that. My wife and I bothe un happy with present one. I read about the Ron type, but the you have to pre this and pre that before even to can occur. Can you suggest what I would have to purchase and install to make such a system to put in my house
Mark Timmons
April 5, 2018 at 2:26 PM
Before I could answer that, I would have to see a detailed water test. If you don't have one, we need one like this: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html
Jeff L
April 23, 2018 at 12:11 PM
Do RO systems remove Fluoride? Thanks. -Jeff
Mark Timmons
April 28, 2018 at 11:01 AM
Yes. WE also have an enhanced Fluoride removal option for extremely high levels: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-aquapurion-5-stage-reverse-osmosis-system-with-enhanced-fluoride-removal.html
Randall
August 31, 2018 at 8:27 AM
Mark, Received the test results back on a house that my husband and I are looking to buy. high lead levels. samples were taken directly from well. need to figure out how much a whole house RO system would cost. could I send you our test results for you to look at?
Mark Timmons
September 3, 2018 at 5:20 PM
Absolutely, send them!
Dawn
October 3, 2018 at 1:12 PM
Please provide pricing on any of these items. I understand it may shock some people, but to not easily find some kind of reference point despite your ability to customize based on number of people, # bathrooms, etc. is not very helpful. I came to this site looking for an idea so that I could budget for it. From the conversations I have seen above, it doesn't appear there are any relative price points on this website at all, which, to be sure, does not make me want to stay and look around or contact you for a quote. I live in Canada, so I really just need an idea on a whole home system. Thank you for your consideration.
Mark Timmons
October 7, 2018 at 10:53 PM
We have pricing on everything on our website. Before I can price anything I would need to know what kind of water you have, how many people and how many bathrooms and other information. I would recommend you call us at 800-608-8792 to discuss your needs.
Amy Dobson
October 24, 2018 at 7:02 AM
We are looking to buy a home that has arsenic and salt in the well water, would you recommend a whole house system?
Mark Timmons
October 24, 2018 at 5:15 PM
We have dealt with this doezens of times. In most cases a whole-house system works well, but BEFORE you buy the house, I would advise you to spend on this test: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html BECAUSE, just one time (1 time) the cost to fix the water was over $150,000.00! It was worse trhan sea water. Knowledge is power. Get a water test first.
Stephen
November 7, 2018 at 1:20 PM
Have a well with high Arsenic III. What would you recommend to oxidize it to Arsenic V before a RO system?
Mark Timmons
November 10, 2018 at 2:47 PM
It depends upon what else is in the water, along with competing contaminants. Do you have a water analysis?
Alvin
November 8, 2018 at 1:28 PM
I currently have and need a whole house R/O system which requires chlorine to be added periodically; the system is 11 years old. Within the past 6 mos I have spent almost $1000 replacing different parts. Today I was told that I need to spend an additional $2500 in parts and labor to keep the system working; therefore, I am considering replacing the entire system (excluding well pump) at a price of approximately $7000 + tax. Is there a more reasonable alternative and / or is that a fair price (new R/O system would include 300 gal poly storage tank with 1/2 hp 20gpm submersible house pump, 31 gal pressure tank, whole house WS1 Vortech back washing carbon filter, WS1 Vortech water softner w/ new salt tank, PH filter and ozone generator machine for sanitizing pure water)?
Mark Timmons
November 10, 2018 at 2:41 PM
We have a new line of whole house RO systems coming out next week that start at $5,995 and do not require a water softener. This is probably the best-designed system on the market for this type of application. How many bathrooms and how many in the family?
Aaron Merritt
November 15, 2018 at 3:45 PM
Just found this article. I have been considering a RO whole home solution for my house. But looks like we might need a little more, or something different than that based on your article, plus what I know about the water. We just drilled a well 2 months ago. Currently, we pump the water from the well into a 5000 gallon storage tank direct from the well (5.5 gpm). From there we have a secondary pump and pressure tank to keep the water at 40-60psi as it goes to the house. We have had the water tested, and these are the results that we have determined: Metals by EPA 200 Series Methods Arsenic - None Detected Boron 4.1 mg/L Calcium 5.6 mg/L Iron 0.15 mg/L Magnesium 4.5 mg/L Manganese 0.024 mg/L Sodium 350 mg/L Metals by EPA Method 200.8 ICP/MS Copper - None Detected Zinc - None Detected Conventional Chemistry Parameters by APHA/EPA Methods Color 10 CU Odor - None Detected pH 8.60 Ph Units Specific Conductance (EC) 1600 umhos/cm Total Dissolved Solids 810 mg/L Turbidity 3.2 NTU Hardness, Total 33 mg/L Anions by EPA Method 300.0
Chloride 34 mg/L Nitrate as 0.90 mg/L Nitrite as N - None Detected Sulfate as SO4 300 mg/L Microbiological Parameters by APHA Standard Methods Total Coliforms: Present E. Coli: Absent
Mark Timmons
November 15, 2018 at 7:16 PM
From what I see, you would be an excellent candidate for whole house reverse osmosis, but it has to be done right. Do you have any odor in the water?
Gene Lipitz
January 14, 2019 at 3:55 PM
hi we are on Phoenix city water. It's very hard (14) with a TDS between 400-700 and chlorine and chloramides present. We'd like out TDS under 100 and no chlorine. Based on the test results, we are not worried about anything else. unfortunately, there is no easy way to separate the house from the landscape watering. Also no easy way to get an under the sink solution to serve anything but the sink. So salt solutions or significant loss of water is not OK. We have 3 people here, 5.5 bathrooms plus the irrigation (about 1/8 acre of lawn at any one time). THe magnet we have installed have resolved about 70% of the hard water issue. Thoughts? Thanks
Mark Timmons
January 17, 2019 at 6:56 PM
The only way to do what you want is with a whole house reverse osmosis system. Our systms are up to 75% efficient, which means that they only waste 1 gallon for every 4 gallons made. It would be cheaper to likely seperate the irrigantion water and use a wh0le house RO for the rest. RO is the only way to lower the TDS.
tony
February 6, 2019 at 9:59 PM
what is the best way to discharge the waste water? our tds is 1500 so would we produce more waste water. were on septic and probably cant handle the extra load. would draining into a sump work?
Mark Timmons
February 10, 2019 at 4:33 PM
In most cases, it is fine to drain into the septic tank, depending upon the water quality. I would need to know more about before your water before commenting.
Catherine
April 8, 2019 at 10:51 AM
Hello Mr. Timmons, If your RO whole house filtration systems work so well at decreasing chemicals like chlorine and chloramines at 97% to 98%, why are you unwilling to offer a performance guarantee? If I test my water after installation and it does not decrease things like chlorine and chloramines by at least 90-95%, I should expect a refund. If you are so confident in your product, why do you not offer this? Sincerely, Catherine
Mark Timmons
April 12, 2019 at 3:29 PM
Catherine, Next time you buy a car, washer, stove, refrigerator or some other appliance, ask for a performance warranty. Tell me how that goes. There are 38,000 possible contaminants that can be in water and the relationships between them can affect performance. If you are willing to spend $3,000 on detailed analytical testing, I will give you an unconditional warranty. As it is, we do have a performance warranty. Only an idiot or a charlatan (who plans to take your money and run) would give you that kind of warranty. What if the city messes up and has 5 ppm of chlorine or chloramine in the water? How can we remove that amount at 97% to 98%? The real answer is that you can't. It is impossible to do unless you are going to put about six carbon filters in line. Let me educate you a little bit: The water treatment industry is deceptive in the way they rate and certify things. For instance, when testing for chloramine or chlorine removal, they take RO water and add the contaminant. There are no other competing contaminants to prevent the process from working. However, in the real world, the contaminants are many and varied and what is tested at 98% in a controlled lab environment with RO water may be only 30% effective in the real world. Think about that for a minute... I am simply speaking the truth.
Eric Cyr
April 12, 2019 at 1:16 PM
I think I need a whole house RO system as our water test came back Iron 0.35mg/L and Chloride 444mg/L. This is on a 30 year old house and the water faucets are failing (corroded). Do I understand correctly that a water softener will not remove the Chloride? Note, I'm talking Chloride, not Chlorine.
Mark Timmons
April 12, 2019 at 3:03 PM
Eric, A water softener will not remove chloride... or chlorine for that matter. You could be a candidate for Whole House RO, but I would need to see a detailed analysis of your water. Do you have that?
Judie
April 15, 2019 at 12:35 PM
We purchased a new (replacement) water softener and iron filter, and added a reverse osmosis system for the kitchen water tap and the fridge, two years ago. We also have a UV filter. Even after the softener and iron filter, our water has many TDS (count is usually around 1,500 PPM). I am frustrated with not being able to put my cutlery in the dishwasher (it gets stained) and we always have a salt film on the dishes. We are considering going to a whole home RO system. What would be involved in going to a whole house RO system? Can we reuse the equipment already in place and just add whatever is needed for the rest?
Mark Timmons
April 18, 2019 at 3:27 PM
You may be able to use your existing equipment, but we would need a couple things: 1. Photos of your system; 2. A detailed water analysis. We would be happy to provide a quote. RO may be the solution, but we would need more info.
Christina
June 19, 2019 at 9:54 AM
How much electricity does a whole house RO use? It uses a pump so I wanted to understand how much the electricity would cost for an average system.
Mark Timmons
July 18, 2019 at 10:22 PM
Probably $6 to $8 a month.