Does Nuvo H2O Soften Water?

By Mark Timmons
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Does Nuvo H2O Soften Water?

I received this question from from Joe Smith (real name).  It turns out that he had a Nuvo H2o "Water Softener" already installed in his house.  Of course, we told him that it doesn't soften water because, by definition, "soft water" is water that has the calcium and magnesium hardness removed from the water to below one grain per gallon (gpg).  He was still skeptical because... well... he had bought one, and didn't want to think he had made the wrong decision.  So, we asked him to send us a sample of the water before the Nuvo and water after the Nuvo.  Here is what we found: Before Nuvo: TDS - 225 PPM Hardness - 11 GPG Iron - ND CHL - ND Nit - ND PH - 6.8 After Nuvo: TDS - 237 PPM Hardness - 11 GPG Iron - ND CHL - ND Nit - ND PH - 6.8 Long story short:  He is requesting a refund from Nuvo and is going to purchase a Fusion NLT water softener which actually does soften the water.  He asked about our Salt Free Water Conditioners (we don't call them "water softeners" because, like Nuvo, they don't soften the water), but after we explained how they work, Joe decided that he wanted a real softener, not something that is called a water softener but doesn't actually soften the water. I went to Nuvo's website which is www.nuvoh2o.com and while it is a nice site, I wonder if they use the word "softener" to mislead people or is there is an actual reasonable explanation behind that?  To me, calling something a water softener when it does not soften the water is deceptive, but maybe I am missing something.  I would invite Nuvo to explain how they can use the word softener, when their system doesn't actually soften water.  Here's your chance...  Show me the error of my ways or forever hold your peace!
February 15, 2014
Comments
Martha Yim
August 23, 2014 at 9:40 AM
I am looking into a water conditioner because my home does not currently have a loop and the best price that I could get from a plumber to install a traditional loop (water and sewer in and out and a vent for the drain) for a salt system was 1500 vs 800 for a saltless system (water in and out only). Unless I use Kinetico and somehow they are able to install for 695, seems strange. I also cannot separate the water lines on the outside of my home so my irrigation will also run through whatever I purchase and I don't want to kill my plants. I have looked at the NuvoH2O because of the small space requirements but I wasn't sure about the fact that they are putting citric acid into the water. I would really appreciate your thoughts on the matter. I know that you sell the green wave are there any smaller units out there that work as well?
Mark Timmons
August 29, 2014 at 7:42 AM
Here is a systems that will flow up to 4 GPM. If you don't have a really big house, it should work. https://www.uswatersystems.com/systems/salt-free-water-conditioners
Steve Baumgartner
January 29, 2015 at 4:52 PM
We're in the process of building a new home (2800 sq ft conditioned space). Our builder suggested Nuvo H2O, says it 'works great for people here'. The biggest issue I see here is mild scale (white on faucets). In the tests you did before & after, where is scale measured?
Mark Timmons
February 3, 2015 at 8:05 AM
Steve, NuvoH2O is supposed to chelate the hardness ions, possibly using citric acid. There may be some theoretical basis for this, but I have never been able to find a scientific explanation as to how it works, nor any studies about it. We have tested it and frankly were unimpressed. What bothers me is that they call it a "softener" when in fact, we have never had the water test soft. Most likely, you builder has some "skin in the game." Maybe that skin is money! Be careful is my advice.
Patti
April 20, 2015 at 12:15 PM
So you sell the Green Wave Water Conditioner? So this may not be a biased opinion.
Mark Timmons
April 20, 2015 at 1:51 PM
NuvoH2o is basically a "one-product" website. We have over 10,000 products. We are water treatment experts and solve a variety of water problems. Yes, we make the Green Wave - we openly tell you that. Yes, we are biased - biased toward technology that works the best! We are constantly testing and developing new products. We are aware of Nuvo's technology and if we felt it performed better (or as good as) the Green Wave, we would sell it. We don't! You can draw your own conclusions.
Kirk
May 15, 2015 at 9:38 AM
These NuvoH2o systems, do they actually capture the particles in the water and bond with the citric acid, making the water systems not build up the scaling or prevent the hard particles from attaching to glass etc.? Do you actually save on water usage with soft water over non softened water? I can see you save on soaps etc., but water usage what ii saving in percentage of softened water usage over unsoftened usage? Do chlorine systems work to soften water? What is the best non salt system to remove iron and soften or treat water? What would you recommend for apartment building 20 one bedroom and 30 efficiency units. Water usage about 15-20,000 gallon a month.
Mark Timmons
May 20, 2015 at 1:28 PM
Kirk, Lots of good questions here. I shall answer them one at a time: <em>These NuvoH2o systems, do they actually capture the particles in the water and bond with the citric acid, making the water systems not build up the scaling or prevent the hard particles from attaching to glass etc.?</em> They add citric acid to the water, which drops the pH, but over time really doesn't do much in our testing of the product. Besides, who wants to make the water acidic? <em>Do you actually save on water usage with soft water over non softened water? I can see you save on soaps etc., but water usage what ii saving in percentage of softened water usage over unsoftened usage?</em> You absolutely do! You cut detergent, laundry, dishwasher and bath soap usage in half. That includes shampoo and toothpaste, and razor blades last almost forever. Additionally, soft water extends the life of clothes and appliances and cut what heating costs by over 30%. The savings are tremendous. <em>Do chlorine systems work to soften water? </em> In a word: NO! <em>What is the best non salt system to remove iron and soften or treat water?</em> It would depend upon a detailed water analysis before I could make a recommendation. <em>What would you recommend for apartment building 20 one bedroom and 30 efficiency units. Water usage about 15-20,000 gallon a month.</em> Start with this: https://www.uswatersystems.com/clean-water-test-best-value.html Then once I know what exactly is in the water, I can make a recommendation... and guarantee it will work.
Tamra madden
July 3, 2015 at 4:53 PM
We installed Nuvo h2o in February, and have the largest cartridge they make, much bigger than needed. Have hated it. We use five times more soap,shampoo, cleaning products etc. It leaves scale so they sent us a new different cartridge that would stop this. It's worse! Much worse. It was called the scrubber. I now have heartburn, and gerd, because the citric acid is killing me. We have to buy bottled water to drink, but you can't cook everything in it or bath in it. We have complained many times and get nothing but a snippy answer that it is working, and we just can't tell! It's like the story of the emperor's clothes. He was naked but they told him his clothes looked good,so he believed them and was happy. I'm not that stupid! This does not work and is harming our health. It's made in Utah where I live. They know better, they know the water here. Now it's time they made it right by us! Waiting for reply
Linda
July 3, 2015 at 4:53 PM
We have Nuvo system and for the past yr being treated for herd also. Just recently the past 8 months my face had had an allergic reaction as if it is been burned. I thought it was my make up but now we r thinking it is the citrus acid which is burning my face too much citrus. Our skin is dry but my face as I stated is like burned and pelting most of the time. Went to doctor and can’t figure it out. Wonder if it is our water system.
Mark Timmons
January 15, 2020 at 8:00 PM
I can't say if that is the problem, but I would shut off the NuvoH2O and see what happens.
Mark Timmons
July 3, 2015 at 7:18 PM
NuvoH2O does not soften the water - Period! I do not know how they get away with calling it a softener. Let us know if we can help... If it helps. I will give you $500 trade in for the NuvoH2o for any of our whole house treatment systems.
Norm Saavedra
July 9, 2015 at 4:19 PM
I live in Mesa Arizona, the water here is unfit to drink... I don't want soft water I just want clean water I can drink, shower, cook with, wash clothes with etc. for my home, approx. 3000 sq ft. already plummed for the house. what's your suggestion? A friend tried to sell me a nuvo h20 system but after reading above... not interested in that one..
Mark Timmons
July 9, 2015 at 9:06 PM
Norm, We sell lots of these systems in your area and people love them: https://www.uswatersystems.com/green-wave-plus-saltless-water-conditioner-chemical-filter-system.html No salt, no chemicals, removes chlorine and chloramine and kills bacteria. Just clean, clear, safe water for drinking, cooking and bathing.
Javier
September 19, 2015 at 1:46 PM
I recently installed a whole house filtration system 3M AQua pure. Three months later the filter became clogged with scale and other hard water elements this particular filter has been installed in other hard water areas with no issues my customer is very upset and I don't install conventional water softens because of the knowledge of side effects to the home plumbing system as well as environmental concerns. I need a system for my customer in trabuco canyon California Adam but I can't do home work on these other systems fast enough I need help please
Mark Timmons
September 19, 2015 at 2:14 PM
Javier, One question to start with: What do you mean by "I don’t install conventional water softens because of the knowledge of side effects to the home plumbing system as well as environmental concerns." Once I understand that, I can address your question.
Justin McKerrow
January 16, 2016 at 12:36 PM
We had a water softener installed in our house when we moved in and it was just buy a local plumber that installed it and purchased the system. Our water is very soft, but we are getting so much salt deposits on our glass in our shower and faucets that it is difficult to remove. More difficult then if it was hard water. Why would a softener do this?? We boil water until its completely dry and at the bottom is a layer of salt crystals. Is the softener bad putting to much salt back into the water?? What can I do to fix this? Sterling Water Treatment 2.5 is who made it. Thank You!
Mark Timmons
January 17, 2016 at 10:24 AM
I would have to see an analysis of your water in order to answer that question. Here's what we would need: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html I suspect there are other issues...
John Washburn
March 11, 2016 at 12:10 PM
We had Nuvoh2o system put in our home 5 years ago. We have not seen any buildup on any of our faucet heads, washer, dish washer etc. We are in Utah so we are in hard water country. Are we a one in a million household that loves Nuvohh2o or is it too early to tell.
Mark Timmons
March 11, 2016 at 8:46 PM
Many people like what NuvoH2o does. In many cases it does an excellent job at preventing scale. It does not, however, soften water. If you are good with just not having scale and don't care about any of the other benefits of soft water, then NuvoH2o may be for you.
Mark Kerfoot
June 1, 2016 at 9:08 PM
Hello Mark, I live in a hard water area (Fresno, CA) and would like to prevent scale. Unfortunately, my home inspector warned me that salt-based softeners are corrosive to my galvanized water pipes (my home dates to 1955). What is your take on this? Do you have any recommendations? I had the water hardness tested once and I recall the grains were in the double digits. Thanks!
Mark Timmons
June 1, 2016 at 10:20 PM
FACT: Salt-based water softeners are not corrosive! So, you can use a water softener without fear: https://www.uswatersystems.com/systems/water-softener-system However, our Green Wave systems are salt-free and also prevent scale: https://www.uswatersystems.com/systems/salt-free-water-conditioners
Jean
October 5, 2016 at 10:02 AM
I'm in NC and I have well water. I also have a simple fiber filter on the main water line...this filters out silt and mica. Still, I have white marks on black toilets and sinks as well as shower heads. What would you suggest? House is over 6000 ssssquare feet. Thank you.
Mark Timmons
October 5, 2016 at 2:57 PM
I would suggest that you do this first, so we can determine exactly what the problem is: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html Once identified, we can apply a sound scientific solution and GUARANTEE the results.
Clayton Strawn
November 3, 2016 at 10:28 AM
I have a lot of iron in my water. If the iron is not removed it stains everything. Will the the no salt system remove the damaging iron? How much do new filters cost?
Mark Timmons
November 14, 2016 at 10:03 PM
You HAVE to remove the iron before the no-salt system.
Mike kelly
December 2, 2016 at 2:30 PM
I live in Inkster, Mi. I just believe that our wayer needs testing i it has chlorine taste. Where & how can i get you a sample with your recommendations?
Mark Timmons
December 4, 2016 at 8:51 AM
I looked up the water report and it does contain chlorine. Are you wanting to treat all the water in your home or just the drinking water?
Le
January 1, 2017 at 4:55 PM
I live in Sturbridge Mass and have my own well. I have a salt water softner system. I have carbon filters that I used as well. I still get a lot of iron stains I noted in the toilet bowls that it is difficult to get it out. i would like to get the water tested and see if I can substitute a salt free water softener because I would like to preserve the environment. What company around the area can come , test the water, and suggest for me for a clean tasting water. Is it sodium permanganate that removes the iron. If so how much and how often for a 5000 sq foot house.
Mark Timmons
January 1, 2017 at 5:15 PM
No company has the equipment to come to your home and do a comprehensive water test. They would need the following equipment in order to do that: • Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry • Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry • Chemically Suppressed Ion Chromatography • Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry • Multi-channel Continuous Flow Analyzer • Discrete Segmented Flow and Flow Injection Analyzer <strong>That equipment would cost several million dollars.</strong> If you call any water company, they are going to send a salesman with a test kit that might test for 7 or 8 different contaminants. These are not EPA Certified tests and 7 or 8 contaminants are not enough. By the way, that salesman works on commission - he needs to sell you something... anything! I am proud to to tell you that we have negotiated a special deal for our customers. Starting this week, we have a water test that tests for 95 different contaminants. It costs $39 and is sent to a EPA certified lab that does have all of the sophisticated testing equipment. <strong>We call it The Best Water Test on the Planet! </strong> Watch for it next week. We can remove all your iron, we just have to know a lot more about your water so that we do it the right way and guarantee the results.
yvonne ashley
January 2, 2017 at 11:43 PM
I am interested to learn more about this water test (' Arriving next wee Thanks , Yvonne
Mark Timmons
January 15, 2017 at 10:25 PM
It's here: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-lab-water-test.html
Kathleen Niermann
January 28, 2017 at 12:29 PM
Is Nuvo h20 plant friendly
Mark Timmons
January 29, 2017 at 9:31 PM
It adds citric acid to the water. Is that plant friendly?
glen
January 31, 2017 at 5:39 PM
I would like to learn more about water conditioning vs. soft.....salt vs. no salt. I would like to have a whole house system, with drinkable water.....It is very confusing ... I have been doing research on the web and ????? Is there one or more that you would install in your house? thank you,
Mark Timmons
February 5, 2017 at 12:02 PM
At US Water Systems, we switched to the new Green Wave system over a year ago and feel that it is by far the best solution on the market. Look at one of these systems: https://www.uswatersystems.com/green-wave-advantage.html https://www.uswatersystems.com/green-wave-edge.html There is a lot of information on this page:https://www.uswatersystems.com/systems/salt-free-water-conditioners ... including videos. If you want to prevent limescale in the water heater and plumbing, this will do a great job. If you are seeking all the benefits of "soft" water, only a water softener can do that: https://www.uswatersystems.com/systems/water-softener-system
Paula
May 1, 2017 at 11:53 AM
If I have a water softening system do I still need to pay Culligan for my RO system under my sink?
Mark Timmons
May 2, 2017 at 9:58 AM
They might frown upon you not paying them if you still have their system.;) A water softener removes hard water minerals that cause damage to plumbing and appliances. It also saves soap and in wonderful for you skin and hair, but in do way does a softener purify water. Many people opt for a reverse osmosis system for drinking water: https://www.uswatersystems.com/drinking-water/reverse-osmosis-systems/under-sink-reverse-osmosis
Robert J Donato
May 13, 2017 at 9:47 AM
Mark, OK, Here is the whole Readers' Digest Condensed Story. I had a "Scale Ban" on my well water here in Central Pennsylvania for many years. It did what was advertised which was help remove some scale from facets, etc. We still had problems with my electric water heater which required my attention every 6 months (or so) to replace elements and a vacuum of the tank to remove calcium. Thinking that my problem was the electric heating elements, 2 months ago I decided that a $ 1,000.00 gas fired, "Renni" tankless, hot water system would be the ticket to a maintenance free system. Now, the Renni is shutting-down due to hardness issues. My guy suggest that I add a Nuvo filter to my system to allow the Renni to function properly. What do you think? I really do not mind the hard water, but,I am totally lost now and need some honest, tough-love, guidance to solve my hard water heating problems. I do not want to throw good money at another bad idea. What is your opinion on the "Scale Ban" ?? Should I remove it ?? Maybe it is working against me with the Renni ?? Rob Donato 717-858-5063
Mark Timmons
May 13, 2017 at 10:22 AM
My opinion of the "Scale Ban" is that if you drill a hole in a cardboard box and put it around your pipe, it would work the same. There is no scientific validity to the process. This may sound self-serving, but it's true. The Green Wave Solo will totally solve your hard water scale problems. That's why we sell it. Here is the solution: https://www.uswatersystems.com/water-filter-module-5-us-water-limeblaster-salt-free-water-conditioner.html Install it on the line to your hot water heater and install the hot water filter AFTER the water heater.
Robert J Donato
May 14, 2017 at 10:51 AM
Mark, I checked the Green Wave at the US Water Systems page and although it sounds good and at a great price ($399 us) compared to the Nuvo ($8-900 + us) it is suggested to change the cartridge every 2 month (regular household) at $70.00 (reg price) to $40.00 (sale price) a pop ... that is $420.00 to $240.00 respectively a year in cartridges. I guess this is the price of fixing my problem ... if it works ... I guess it is worth the price.
Margaret Onan
June 17, 2017 at 10:25 AM
Just a quick comment here, after looking into NuvoH2O (being tired of having to haul all the salt). If it does actually acidify your water to below 7.0, (which by adding acid to the water would certainly be a possibility) it could be very dangerous for people with copper pipes that have copper sensitivities such as Wilson's disease, as it would accelerate leaching and integration of copper into the water supply from the copper piping.
jim
June 27, 2017 at 11:00 AM
I'm starting to put two and two together. Science tells us that cancer grows in an acidic environment. People today are drinking questionable water, unlike our grandparents who drank well water with naturally high alkalinity (the opposite of acidity ). cancer rates continue to rise.
Vince
July 11, 2017 at 2:00 PM
Mark Timmons and his company are spot on and honest in every answer. Nuvo H2O is not a water softener and is not approved as a water softener as classified and tested under ANSI Standard 44 for water softening devices. Test the Nuvo H2O and you have hard water in and hard water out. The infomercial is also very very misleading and presents many false facts. First RO water in almost all ( ot every) are a 1 to 1 waste or less. Not 1 to 4 as they claim. Second the Nuvo H2O does not change the TDS or remove harmful contaminants from water like RO does. They also do not explain that while WHO says drinking ultrapure water is not good, most RO systems can add beneficial minerals for the body back in after pulling the harmful out. Nuvo is very misleading. Think about it. Aren't most companies on late night infomercials.
Wendy Savastano
July 14, 2017 at 6:43 PM
Hi Mark, I was looking online for info on citrus water systems because my husband has been mentioning it as a possible solution to our water issues. I'm very happy that I came across this site, because I'm thinking that it doesn't sound like what I'm looking for. Here's the issue: We purchased our home just over a year ago. We have well water, a new pressure tank, an existing water filtration system and Culligan softener (in that order), had a water test as part of the inspection, and are within a Superfund Area with no reports of well issues. (The FILTH that ran through these pipes after replacing the pressure tank was mind- boggling!!!) We also put in a new water heater. The water in this house (hot or cold) *STINKS STRONGLY* of sulphur (rotten eggs). It makes my stomach turn to put my family's clothes into a washing machine full of this, and to 'clean' the baby's bottles - as well as the rest of our plates & utensils - with it, never mind cooking! I don't even like bathing the children or showering in it! If it sits in the sink, it also develops a dark colored slime all over everything. It's incredibly disgusting. The old faucets are literally falling apart from the calcium, lime, etc. buildup. My husband just replaced the filter as I'm writing this, after 4 months of use, and he had to wipe out all of the black gunk built up inside of it- the same stuff that is staining the tanks of ALL of my brand new toilets. After reading all of the previous posts & answers, I still have questions. First, do I need to get this water test or would test results from last year be sufficient? Second, what if your system appears to be the solution, but isn't? Thanks for your time!
Mark Timmons
July 15, 2017 at 11:46 PM
If you have a good water test, that should be sufficient. Send it to support@uswatersystems.com and we will get back with you. If you have a detailed water analysis, we will recommend the solution and GUARANTEE the results.
Jess
July 20, 2017 at 9:45 AM
Hi, I just ordered the test kit from the US water site Do i send you the result and then you can tell me what kind of water softener or whatever it is called that I need? We are just moving to a new house and I want to buy a product that is all-around friendly to my children, plants, pool, and everything in the house especially drinking. thank you very much for your comments. I was thinking of buying the Nuvoh2o, but i'm not sure after reading the comments. I hope you can help me and my children find the right product; your product sounds eco friendly.
Mark Timmons
July 22, 2017 at 2:50 PM
The lab sends us the results and we can then determine what the best course of action is. Our new Pulsar Systems are extremely green and remove more contaminants than any other system: https://www.uswatersystems.com/city-municipal-water-filtration
Jess
July 20, 2017 at 9:46 AM
oh btw my house is 2900q. ft and I live in las vegas, nv. ty
Jenny
July 28, 2017 at 5:15 PM
Hi Mark, I am building a new house in Utah and would like a whole house water filtration unit. My husband says we also need a water softener for our tankless water heater. Can you steer me in the right direction? I'm needing an answer pretty quickly as we are plumbing right now. Thanks!
Mark Timmons
July 29, 2017 at 11:31 PM
What is in the water? Is it city or well water? If it is well water, do you have a water analysis?
Jenny
July 28, 2017 at 5:50 PM
I'm researching the AquaOx filter. Any thoughts on that? Thanks!
Mark Timmons
July 29, 2017 at 11:32 PM
In one word: Gimmick! I would be happy to elaborate!
Jenny
July 28, 2017 at 6:09 PM
Btw-the house is 8500 sq. ft.
Mark Timmons
July 29, 2017 at 11:32 PM
How many bathroom and how many in the family?
Danny Robins
August 2, 2017 at 9:52 AM
Confused.which system really works best for mobile home?
Danny Robins
August 2, 2017 at 9:59 AM
Need help to get the best water softening system
Mark Timmons
August 2, 2017 at 10:58 AM
Danny, You can only get SOFT water with a water softener. If you are in a mobile home, how much space do you have? Are you n city or well water? NuvoH2o does not soften water, so if you are comparing NuvoH2o then this would be what we have: https://www.uswatersystems.com/water-filter-module-5-us-water-limeblaster-salt-free-water-conditioner.html It's much cheaper than NuvoH2o and while it does not soften water, it does protect the plumbing and everything water touches from limescale.
Corey Larson
August 31, 2017 at 5:40 PM
I just changed my filter. Is it normal to smell like pond scum
Mark Timmons
September 1, 2017 at 3:24 PM
I would think not, but what kind of filter is it?
jim
September 3, 2017 at 11:33 PM
I have been in the business of soften. Water for over 40 yrs. I have seen about every scam the is to "soften water" the only thing that softens water is a water softner.
Lisa
September 13, 2017 at 8:51 PM
I need a softener and a whole house filter. What would you recommend in my case? I have well water and it's muddy/murky. Tested hardness at 20 and iron level is null. So, I need to be able to filter and soften. 5 bedroom / 4.5 baths
Mark Timmons
September 16, 2017 at 1:19 PM
Step 1: https://www.uswatersystems.com/fusion-superfilter-professional-backwashing-filter-for-sediment.html - 20 GPM Model ($1,395.00) Step 2: https://www.uswatersystems.com/matrixx-water-softener-with-smartphone-programming.html - 20 GPM Model ($1,395.00) Step 3: https://www.uswatersystems.com/module-4-us-water-disruptor-zeta-filter.html - 25 GPM Model ($559.95) We have discounts available as well. Call 800-608-8792 for further help.
Lisa
September 17, 2017 at 10:44 AM
Mark...Are you saying that I need all 3 of the items you suggested?
Ray Gibson
September 19, 2017 at 4:35 PM
Hello, we live in Goodyear, AZ. Can you please recommend a proven water softener/drinking water system. Our home is approximately 2,700 sf. Thank you very much for any assistance provided! Ray Gibson
Mark Timmons
September 19, 2017 at 6:08 PM
This is what I have in my home and what I recommend: https://www.uswatersystems.com/matrixx-water-softener-with-smartphone-programming.html https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-aquapurion-5-stage-permeate-pump-ro-system.html If you want the best, that is it! Let me know if you have more questions.
Ron Obvious
October 5, 2017 at 9:04 PM
Mr. Obvious, I believe that you are disparaging a competitor as you mislead consumers on s technology you simy don't understand. That makes you untrustworthy in my book.
Mark Timmons
October 7, 2017 at 9:26 PM
I am sorry, but what you wrote in incomprehensible. Can you elaborate?
Will
October 6, 2017 at 11:46 AM
A citric acid softener works by binding the metallic hardness ions to a weak amount of citric acid metered slowly into the source water. The citric acid binds with the hardness ions, thus preventing them from reacting with the surfactant ions, when that gets added later during injection. The key to making a citric acid softener work for a Truck Mount application is precise metering of the citric acid. Too little, and only partial chelation occurs, merely making the water a "little less" hard. Too much citric acid, and the excess citric acid left after chelation will react with your alkaline cleaning detergents, making them less effective. Hence, you need to know just how hard the water being treated is. I would be interested to know how these systems take this into account. Also, you can't use conventional techniques to test for end-state water hardness, since the metallic ions would still test as being present. This is because chelation does not produce a conventional reaction where a third compound is the result. Chelators merely "bind" with the ions to form a complex.
Mark Timmons
October 7, 2017 at 9:28 PM
So, just to be clear, is it your testimony, under oath, that citric acid softens water? Simple question: Yes or No?
Josh Spencer
October 7, 2017 at 10:52 AM
Look into Kinetico for water softeners and RO drinking water systems. You can look in consumers best for ratings on the systems. There’s nothing better at treating water.
Mark Timmons
October 7, 2017 at 9:08 PM
Kinetico is a good system, but not any better than many others on the market. But, if you buy one you will make your salesman very happy because his commission is more than the cost of our best softener... which by the way, is as good or better than Kinetico in every respect. P.S. BTW, I used to sell Kinetico for a few years.
Robert
October 14, 2017 at 3:09 PM
I am looking for a system that will remove salt from our water. We were told Nuvo does that but that is not what I read in the advertisement. Any suggestions?
Mark Timmons
October 16, 2017 at 12:16 PM
Reverse Osmosis is the only way to economically do that. Do you have a detailed water analysis?
Eliot
October 14, 2017 at 10:39 PM
I bought a NuvoH2O and a 10" iron remover in front of the h2o. I didn't think it would work . I have to say , it's cleaning pipes somehow. My hot water heater temperature hasn't been changed but it kept getting hotter to the point I had to turn it back. As the filter got past replacement time ,(H2O filter), that's when the smell kicked in. I then turns the bypass and am trying to decide if I want to replace the H2O filter or just put in a sediment filter if one will fit into the H2Os filter housing.
Mark Timmons
October 16, 2017 at 12:15 PM
The NuvoH2O uses citric acid to drop the pH which helps control scale. This is a cheaper Alternative that works and is much more economical to operate: https://www.uswatersystems.com/water-filter-module-5-us-water-limeblaster-salt-free-water-conditioner.html
Dan
October 19, 2017 at 11:47 AM
I use a hybrid system. I have very hard water. Street water comes into the house and into a Northstar (pick your own brand) water softener. Just before that I pick off a segment that goes into the kitchen cold water side only (for drinking and cooking) that is processed through a separate carbon (or multi-stage) filter and also serves the instant hot water faucet and a drinking water faucet on the countertop as well as the fridge ice makers. So I don't drink or cook with the softened water but all the appliances and showers are served with softened water. It works great. That's the best of two worlds
Dan
October 19, 2017 at 3:33 PM
The use of the above hybrid system avoids all the nonsense about soft water vs 'treated water' or whatever scam as Jim says there is out there. Only a water softener softens water, everything else is snake oil. A good large true water softener runs about $1500 installed. A good carbon filter runs about $100 and a PEX bypass to the cold side of the kitchen faucet is about $200 labor and parts. Compare that to something like a Life Source or similar 'whole house' filter scam that runs $4500 or more and you still have hard water. You just paid $4500 for a $100 carbon and particulate filter combo.
Vince Kent
October 24, 2017 at 3:16 PM
Mark Timmons is spot on with his professional comments and explanation. Our company has been in the water treatment business since 1953 and we are on our third generation, we have seen every magnet, electronic devices with wires wrapped around the pipes, to now " citric acid" to provide salt free softening. I have been through similar analysis of these devices, and have the exact same findings as Mark. I have challenged H2O Nuvo to provide the science, and they will not. I have challenged them publicly to have their devices tested under the new ANSI / NSF scale prevention test rig. No company has submitted for testing since it was established a year ago. If these devices worked we would all carry them. why? Because the replacement filters / cartridges are repeat profitable business.
I Hate DisInformation Agents
November 5, 2017 at 3:44 PM
If Will's explanation was over your head, why are you in the business? Or were you responding to someone else? I agree with Ron Obvious. This is a biased and misleading article that is bashing a product with the potential to disrupt the industry while pushing your products onto naïve consumers. Cool.
Mark Timmons
November 5, 2017 at 5:17 PM
Look, this is evidently over your head, because Will's comments prove my point! NuvoH2o Does not soften water. That is my point. - The entire thrust of this blog is "<em>Does Nuvo H2O Soften water</em>?" - Do you even comprehend that NuvoH2O calls it a water softener and yet it does not soften the water. I am not disparaging the product. Can you read English? - We have used the product and it is useful in some cases. IT JUST DOES NOT SOFTEN WATER, <strong>YET THEY PERSIST IN CALLING IT A WATER SOFTENER!</strong> - I never disparaged the product - just the way they deceive people by saying it softens the water, when it does not! - Citric acid is not disruptive technology, but it is effective at preventing scale in certain applications. Go back and re-read (slowly if necessary) what I wrote and quit putting words in my mouth that did not originate with me. - <strong>Do you work for NuvoH2O? If not, why are you spouting such nonsense? I despise trolls!</strong> - If you and Mr. Obvious used your real names, I might give you a sliver of credibility, but you have none. Goodbye!
Jack Wolf
December 24, 2017 at 2:58 PM
I purchased the NuvolH20 because TV" Ask This Old House" had show showing this system being installed in a Home In Arizona. Simple install and mentioned that the WHITE residue would be gone in period of time? They mention the client reported it is starting work after 30 days? I thought if This Old House was backing this product it must be GOOD??? The 90 day guarantee note I can return with in the time period for full refund less tax and s &h. My aim is to get rid of the SALT system that I have been using ????
Mark Timmons
December 24, 2017 at 3:37 PM
I guess it depends upon what the Shipping & Handling is. In case you don't know, programs like "This Old House" will endorse you if you pay them. We refused! Evidently NuVoH2O paid the price. Those endorsements are all bought. You can certainly try the NUVOH2O and return it after 90 days if it doesn't work... or you could try our <a href="https://www.uswatersystems.com/water-filter-module-5-us-water-limeblaster-salt-free-water-conditioner.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener nofollow">Limeblaster</a> for one year and return it if it doesn't work... and it's a lot cheaper! Here's what bothers me, NUVOH2O says that they soften the water. If they do, I will pay for your system. There are standard water tests to determine whether the water is soft. Get the NUVOH2O installed and if it does soften your water, I will hand you the cash to pay for it. How can I say that? Simple: it does not soften the water. That is a lie! I'll let you figure the rest out!
gg
January 1, 2018 at 9:40 PM
Well ...define "soft".
Mark Timmons
January 1, 2018 at 10:58 PM
The NuvoH2O claims to produce softer water by using citric acid rather than sodium. However, experts in water technology say getting softer water from a salt-free system is impossible; the only way to soften water is to use sodium. A salt-free system like nuvoH2O produces conditioned, not softened, water. Define "soft"? Look it up and you will see that they do not make the water soft. PERIOD! Do you really not understand this... or are you working for NuvoH2O? I am incredulous...
Raymond Tobias
January 4, 2018 at 6:51 PM
Hello, I live in Pennsylvania and I'm looking for a system to treat the iron in my well water. Water test results were hardness 6.0, Iron 1.5, ph 7.0, TDS 83. I was looking a culligan medallist series water softener. I'm looking for a system that doesn't use a lot of water to flush or regenerate the system since I have a well. Culligan rep said I only uses 32 gallons about every 10 days to regenerate. I have my doubts about that. Thank you.
Mark Timmons
January 7, 2018 at 10:56 AM
That would likely be a huge understatement. All systems are going to have to use 50-60 gallons of water to function properly. Our Fusion NLT can save up to 75% on water usage: https://www.uswatersystems.com/fusion-nlt-professional-grade-metered-water-softener.html
Todd Yancey
January 14, 2018 at 9:04 AM
I had orange water. Hardness 6 pH 6 and tds 400. High iron and maganese content. I had black chunks in my faucet screens. We tried a number of things. I installed a kinetico system and a RO system to feed my kitchen sink. Yes it Was 4 grand but my water is really nice. Kinetico is a flow generated system using no electrc. It is easy on salt and is an on demand system. I did figure out the are a lot of salesman out there. But not many that have a clue what they are doing.
Mark Timmons
January 14, 2018 at 12:11 PM
Nothing wrong with a Kinetico - It's a good system. However, our system will works as good or better and the RO filters and membranes are 30% of the cost of a Kinetico - all for under $2,000.00. What could you do with an extra $2,000?
Adam Goodrich
January 22, 2018 at 3:54 PM
Which Nuvo system did you test? The "COMPLETE" which includes both a filter and a "non-salt softener" https://www.homedepot.com/p/NuvoH2O-Complete-Salt-Free-Water-Softener-System-50-000-Gal-DPNCB/207107279 OR this smaller one that is a "non-salt softener" only? https://www.homedepot.com/p/NuvoH2O-Home-Salt-Free-Water-Softener-System-35-000-Gal-DPHB/206481057
Mark Timmons
January 29, 2018 at 11:51 AM
Both
Catherine Hess
February 4, 2018 at 1:49 PM
Mark Timmons, what is your opinion regarding how the water is tested. I have read that different testing would need to be used to test water where the minerals were attached to the citric acid...they are still there, just unable to bond to your pipes & appliances. What are your thoughts on this?
Mark Timmons
February 10, 2018 at 12:25 PM
Look, citric acid is usually effective at preventing limescale. That's a given, but it in no way creates "soft water." FYI, the minerals do not "attach" top the citric acid. Our Limeblaster is just as effective at half the price!
Cameron M
February 13, 2018 at 11:15 AM
Are there any benefits to having both the Nuvo and a water softner? I have both on my home and am wondering if it's worth the $75 to replace the filter on the Nuvo system?
Mark Timmons
February 18, 2018 at 5:47 PM
Yes, the benefit is not to you, but to NuvoH2O! They make more money. If you have a softener, it's absurd to use both.
Nick Rostas
February 15, 2018 at 10:39 AM
I was just about purchasing a NUVO citric acid filter - finding your comments made me skeptical. My main objective is to remove and prevent scaling from the water lines and faucets in a small house using less than 35K gallon of water annually. What system do you suggest to get?
Mark Timmons
February 18, 2018 at 5:20 PM
Well, NuvoH2O DOES NOT soften water. It bothers me that they call it a softener. Citric Acid does prevent scale, but so does our Limeblaster. Our Limeblaster in about half the price and the yearly operating cost are lower. So, why would anyone use anything else? Plus, it has a 1-Year Money-Back Guarantee. https://www.uswatersystems.com/water-filter-module-5-us-water-limeblaster-salt-free-water-conditioner.html
T R Lager
March 2, 2018 at 12:42 PM
Nuvo h20 has been around for years serving the largest Hotel, Restaurant, Hospital and Institutional businesses As a restaurant chain owner we used their products successfully throughout the country When they entered the residential market in 2014 they won best new product at The National Association of Home Builders and Remodelers Show in La Vegas and here is what they said: Best Indoor Living Product: a salt free Water Softening System by NuvoH20. Formerly available only commercially, the revolutionary technology lowers the pH level of water without water waste or use of electricity. No more hard water deposits in your shower, dishwasher, dishes or pipes, and the water is safe for all household uses, including bathing, drinking, or watering plants. That is a ringing endorsement !!!
Mark Timmons
March 2, 2018 at 1:27 PM
I have never said that it is not a good product. I have tested it and used it. I object that they insist on calling it a "water softener" when it does not soften the water. Just call it what it is, not something it isn't. They call it that because it tricks many people into buying it. I objection to the deception, not the product.
Rick Rutledge
March 6, 2018 at 8:00 AM
It’s easy to say, “Nothing else does X” when you get to define X. You define “soft” water based on the amount of a mineral that is *present*. The post that explains the chelation process (which you described as “incomprehensible”) simply points out that, for most people, the working definition of “soft” water is really a question of *available* mineral, not *present* mineral. We’re happy if the mineral is not free to cake up in the pipes, interfere with soap, etc. The citric acid systems “deactivate” the mineral by reacting with it, using traces of food-grade acid. The mineral comes, and goes, without interfering with our use of the water, thus making it “soft” for our practical purposes. Is it still there? Sure, but it won’t stick to the pipes. Does it hurt anything? No; it’s still available in your drinking water so that, for instance, your body can make use of it. The net RESULT for consumers is the same as “soft” water by your definition, because they don’t get the “hard” water damage. They also get the advantage of descaling, which merely softening water doesn’t give you. And their municipal water treatment plan (or septic tank) is spared several hundred pounds of salt flushed into the system each year. Your objection to them calling it a “water softener” is based on nothing more than wanting to distinguish the product you’re selling based on word play. (I’m a lawyer; I deal with this game every day.) In everyday language, it’s called “spin.”
Mark Timmons
March 6, 2018 at 9:24 AM
Counselor, Your argument is extremely weak. I do not define "soft water." That has been accomplished long ago. There are hundreds of scholorly sources that define it, including white papers, dictionaries and encyclopedias. I can list them so as to make an evidentiary foundation in order to introduce them into evidence, if you like. Contrary to what you say, the water is not "soft" for practical purposes. Three of the properties of soft water are: 1. Prevention of scale in pipe; 2. Increased sudsing of soaps and detergents. In fact, "soft" water decreases soap and detrergent usage by up to 75%. This video shows exactly how it works: https://vimeo.com/218025829; and 3. Low mineral content. Water treated with citric acid does meets 33% of the criteria to be considered "soft" but it does not meet the other 66%. You make an issue that your body can "make use of it" referring to the calcium. If you drank a bathtub full a day you might get 10% of the minerals your body needs. WATER IS NOT A SIGNIFICANT SOURCE OF MINERALS! That's a smokescreen! Yes, the sodium is not in the wastewater, although water can be "softened" without sodium, but the extra soaps, chemicals, detergents and cleansers are in the water. Which is worse - the salt or the chemicals? The NET RESULT is not the same: The minerals are still in the water and it does not enhance sudsing. It is not soft water. That is untrue. Where I am from we call things that are untrue "lies." They could say "It acts like soft water by preventing scale." But, they don't because they would not sell as much. I have spoken to hundreds of consumers who bought these products believing that the water was soft when in fact, it was not. The deception and spinning of the word "soft" gets them to buy. You have not met your burden of proof. I am not the one doing the spinning... You are!
Concerned
March 9, 2018 at 6:48 AM
Mark - I started reading your blog in an effort to gather information for my thesis paper. Well sir to make a long story short you stated that "There are hundreds of scholorly sources that define it, including white papers, dictionaries and encyclopedias. I can list them so as to make an evidentiary foundation in order to introduce them into evidence, if you like." As a concerned chemist I think you may want to retract that statement based on the fact that when you are studying for your PHD in chemistry with an emphasis on Water. You have to study Lime Scale and its formation as well as how to treat it. I have included this exert from my Compound Chemistry Book published in 2016 which states the following. "Water Softeners – Appliances such as dishwashers can soften water by passing it thru an ion exchange resin. This exchanges scale causing metal ions in the water for sodium ions. Compounds such as citric acid and sodium sesquicarbonate can also be used to soften water. Removing Limescale – Once limescale has been formed, it can only be removed from appliances or surfaces by reacting it with an acid. A variety of acids can be used, all of which react with calcium carbonate to produce a soluble calcium salt, along with carbon dioxide and waiter as side products." Not to mention that my College text book called "Water Chemistry published in 2014" states that. "Many types of acids can be used to soften water. " It also states that "soft water is water that is free of mineral ions as well as dissolved salts." Do water softener's (ion exchange systems) leave residual salt in the water? Yes or No? Then in the books entitled "The handbook of environmental chemistry: Water published in 2015" and "The Water Quality Handbook published in 2016" all say something very similar as well. Just to be clear I am only getting involved in this discussion as I am working on my thesis paper. Then last year, I did a study of salt waste in water last year for a paper in which I looked at only Oklahoma City Oklahoma, what it cost them to remove the residual salt from waste water from softener waste. What I found was astonishing that in OKC alone there was over 1 Trillion gallons of water wasted by Salt based softeners. In which OKC spent over $500,000.00 to treat and was only able to reclaim 77%. I can't help but ask you what happened to the other 23% that they could not reclaim and how many lakes were drained because of salt softeners. I have even found where there states that are filing legislation against the use of "Salt Softeners" for their environmental impact. Please give me your thoughts
Mark Timmons
March 11, 2018 at 4:13 PM
I agree that we should try and reduce the use of salt, so you are preaching to the choir on that one. - You are using some out of context quotes, but if you consider the overall body of information on this, the fact remains that water low in calcium and magnesium is considered soft and how it reacts with soaps and cleaning agents is another component. - To soften hard water, you need to take the hard minerals out with a water softener, reverse osmosis, or a specialized chemical that irreversibly binds up the mineral. To see if the hard minerals are bound up, just do a soap test. - I have seen nothing to dissuade me from believing what most people when comprehend the English language understand.
Jim Perry
March 9, 2018 at 1:40 PM
Because of the This Old House episode we're considering the Nuvo system TO REMOVE SCALE BUILDUP AND DISHWARE DEPOSITS in dishwasher and ease of installation. (Emphasis because we don't care about having water softened.) In the closet with the water heater there is a copper loop that looks as though it might have been left for water softener installation. That was where I was planning to install the Nuvo system. Would the Limebuster be equally as simple to install?
Mark Timmons
March 11, 2018 at 4:01 PM
Yes... and it would be just as effective and cheaper to operate.
Pete Grant
June 21, 2018 at 9:06 AM
I've used a salt system since 1996, a Kenmore. We never had any scaling and the water always felt wonderful. I foolishly replaced it with a NuvoH20 system. BIG MISTAKE! I haven't had it long enough to verify that it will prevent scaling, but the water feels awful - we call it sticky water. Softness tests show that the water coming out of the system has the same hardness as the water going in, If you want soft water stay away from this system.
Michael
June 21, 2018 at 10:23 AM
Who ever wrote this article clearly has ZERO understanding of chemistry, ion-charge affinity nor how chelation works, period. They obviously know nothing of a TDS verses Ohm meter for disolved ions. This article is terribly misleading. Of course the before and after water test results are the same. The same disolved solids are present! They are however chelated, meaning in layman's terms they are locked up and unreactive. They can longer bind to your pipes or appliances. Unlike a water "softener" that removes metals and minerals the citric acid system "deactivates" them but leaves them present in solution. This why you CANNOT water your plants with "softened" water but you can with acid conditioned water. The writer of this article should never be allowed to write again and US Water Systems should write a correction. The term "softener" is understood by the consumer as conditioning. NO SYSTEM SOFTENS WATER. It conditions it, wow talk about playing semantics. "Hard" water or "soft" water is an industry consumer oriented term, NOT a physical chemistry term. You CANNOT use a total disolved solids (TDS) meter you must use an ion meter at least or a mili-ohm meter to measure conductivity of the dissolved active ions to meaure the active ions, ergo bad ions. This article is writen by US Water Systems to sell their product by producing a liable article. Citric acid conditioning works, its how reagent grade water is made for water based chemistry analyzers and is termed ultra pure. This type of conditioning has been used for decades on industrial scales but is now available to the general consumer.
Mark Timmons
June 21, 2018 at 10:54 AM
Michael, If I could buy you for what you know and sell you for what you think you know I'd be the ricest man in the world. Stay tuned: I am going to do a video is response to this drivel. This is going to be fun.
Kirk Rowland
July 23, 2018 at 10:59 AM
Do I need to hire a plumber to install the Limeblaster system or can I do it myself? I live in Omaha Nebraska.
Mark Timmons
July 27, 2018 at 5:51 PM
If you can mow your own yard, you can do this.
Pete sims
August 13, 2018 at 3:11 PM
Michael is actually correct. Results will be the same. Research is your friend. Also if your water is "sticky" using the system too much citric acid is being introduced, it just needs to be dialed back.I found it is a bit of trial and error to get it dialed in but once set you are good to go. No biggie.
Mark Timmons
August 18, 2018 at 11:33 PM
Drink that Kool-Aid, Pete. Do you work for those guys?
jeff
August 16, 2018 at 12:28 PM
you are absolutely correct . i made the mistake of buying one of these nuvo h20 pieces of junk. the only thing softened was my wallet!!!
Tim Hoover
September 9, 2018 at 3:37 PM
I am a plumbing contractor and do mostly service and repair. My wife and I have owned and operated our business for over 40 years now. I will not sell products to my customers until I know they work. I have had a NUVOh2o on my house for 3 years now and the results are; no scale build up on my fixtures and the shower heads are not clogged or nasty looking, no slimy feel on my skin and no "limp hair", no more build up of scale in my water heater (it no longer rumbles) and the shower door water spots wipe off with ease. I did not notice a difference in washing clothes but I did washing the car. I am in Southern California and we are always attempting to conserve water. A salt based system uses too much water and in all of the coastal City's they are prohibited for that reason. But today I still see them being sold and installed as the rules must only apply to some. Also you have to pipe the house as not to water your landscape with the salt contaminated water. Many times I have had to flush house water systems of the brine escaping from the brine tank of a water softener. Not fun. I am very careful when I sell the Nuvo (only after about a year in use in my own home) as NOT to tell them that it is soft water (especially if they have had salt based softened water) as it does not "feel" the same. Nuvo would do themselves a favor with being more truthful on what to expect. I also learned the hard way and spilled some of the water that was in the cartridge container onto my cement driveway approach. It cleaned the cement to a white I did not know existed, instantly. They do warn about contact with certain materials and I was not careful enough. The "stain" has since gone away but it got my attention. Bang for buck its an OK/good deal, just don't expect something its not. As for protecting your plumbing fixtures, dishwasher, water heater (a tankless would benefit also) and your coffee maker, its a great deal. But then I have put two different tankless water heaters in my house in the last 8 years with total disappointment, my gas bill was no different and when the ambient temp would drop my wife could not get hot enough water to fill a bathtub. I will not sell them to my customers. For new customers I have removed 12 in the 2 last years. They save nothing. FYI, I have a high efficiency, high recovery 50 gallon tank type. Will it live to be cost effective? Time will tell.
Mark Timmons
September 15, 2018 at 9:27 PM
Thank you for your candor. You should tell NuvoH2O what you said here.
michele ruiz
September 10, 2018 at 5:09 PM
NUVOH2O says they do not remove RUST. what good are they then. IN my life hard water is rust soft water is clear. Why would anyone pay for this & still have RUSTY water? I don't get it
David Kimball
November 17, 2018 at 10:24 PM
I bought my Nuvo system about a year ago off a tv add. Hired a plumber to install it for me, because it was a lot harder than claimed it would be. My main reason for getting a (water softener) was for skin problems. I have both Lupus, and psoriasis, they assured me that it would stop my skin problems, as well as scaling. The salesman on the phone told me it would cure everything from scurvy to toenail fungus. What an idiot I was to believe that crap, I am more broke out on my skin than I have ever been. You can have mine when I can afford a real water softener, like my sister in law has. I have used theirs and in several days my skin clears up. She lives 2500 miles away.
Linda
November 23, 2018 at 2:22 PM
Help. We are new to Arizona. Originally from the state of Washington, our well water from the Pacific Northwest is wonderful. I may need a support group for my obsession with trying to get my dishwasher to run properly. Without the cloudy glassware which look like someone just drank milk out of the glass. We purchased the home in Arizona with a water softener system. The air conditioning was out. While having it repaired the technician from Ben Franklin said our water softener system needed to be replaced with the Nuvo system the best you can buy to the tune of 6;000.00 (fish on right) which is the going price for a new system. I have spent hundreds on dishwashing additives rinse aids to the point where I have a pantry full of products. We won’t even go into the numer of skin moisturizers for itchy skin I have purchased. I bitched so much to the company they replaced the new unit with another new unit. Same thing. When we leave for the summer months here in Fort Mohave we fill five gallon buckets with water. 5 months returned to water all evaporated (which we expected) and every bucket had an inch, no kidding, of salt in bottom of buckets. I’m at my wits end of what to do. Do I get a different system which is better for Fort Mohave area or go on Zoloft. Your expertise will be much appreciated. Linda
Mark Timmons
November 23, 2018 at 3:28 PM
It infuriates me that companies like this continue to get away with this kind of stuff. The water in that area can be from 25 to 40 grains of hardness. You need a real water softener, not a system that “claims” to soften the water. If I were you, I would file a complaint with the BBB and Attorney General against NUVO and the plumber for what they have done. A good water softener might cost $1,500.00 but it will solve your problems. By the way, that’s not salt in the bottom of the bucket, it’s calcium carbonate… often called “limescale.” The only way to remove it is with a softener. There’s no such thing as a “salt-free water softener.” A softener like our Matrixx will get you off Zoloft! We are currently running a great sale. <a href="https://www.uswatersystems.com/matrixx-water-softener-with-smartphone-programming.html" rel="nofollow"></a>
Paul Trafas
December 3, 2018 at 8:55 PM
Mark Timmons is absolutely correct. I am a Master Certified water specialist with 35 years in the profession designing systems for IBM, the EPA, and state agencies. The only way to soften water for a house hold is with a cation exchange water softener. This does not change the TDS of the water but exchanges hardness ions with either sodium or potassium whichever type you're using. These other nonsense devices are indeed malpractice . Hardness is hardness and unless you remove it is a psychological filter. Stick with the proven
Bob
February 12, 2019 at 9:56 PM
I've read through many of these comments and am not sure what exactly to believe about the products. I don't like the thought of adding sodium or potassium to water I may be drinking. I have had past health issues that required treatment for excessive sodium and potassium in my body. What it looks like to me is that Mark Timmons is a salesman here. I don't know if the Nuvo system works or not, but one thing I have learned in my life is that you can't trust a salesman, whether it be one from Nuvo or the previous comments.
Mark Timmons
March 6, 2019 at 8:41 PM
1. Nuvo does not soften water 2. I do not recommend drinking soft water - use Reverse Osmosis. 3. That is all true... not sales mumbo jumbo. You are going to believe what you want... probably what some charlatan tells you.
Mike Carnell
July 3, 2019 at 6:13 PM
Why is there BLOOD RED water coming out of my faucet?
Mark Timmons
July 18, 2019 at 9:12 PM
I would need to see a water analysis in order to determine that: https://www.uswatersystems.com/us-water-systems-professional-lab-water-test.html
Allan
July 9, 2019 at 2:20 PM
So, I was already steering away from a NuVo system when I stumbled across this site.... I don't know anything more about NuVo, but I do know that that there is no way in hell I'm giving any money to this crank. Anyone who responds to counter-arguments with screamy/shouty/name-calling.... well, screw that.
Barbara
July 29, 2019 at 7:49 AM
I just saw a NuVo system commercial and, did I misunderstand something? The host said the NuVo actually SAVES water (his words) over other water conditioning systems. He had four 1-gallon jugs of water on one side of the table and one 1-gallon jug on the other side. He said that with other systems it takes four gallons of water to make one gallon of conditioned water, but with the NuVo system you get all the water that was put in. WHAAAAAAT? That didn't make sense to me. Can you explain what he was talking about? Thanks.
Mark Timmons
July 29, 2019 at 5:50 PM
Nuvo is just a filter that adds a citric acid to the water. It doesn't take anything out, so it doesn't need to waste water. It also does not soften the water, even though they call it a "softener."
Wayne crow
August 4, 2019 at 2:46 PM
I just purchached a home built in 1950. Has an old boiler. Will introducing soft water into the boiler and piping system cause problems?
Mark Timmons
August 9, 2019 at 12:49 PM
Wayne, I really can't answer that question as I do not know what is in your water (at what levels) and how much of it is in your pipes. You will likely have problems either way. With a boiler that old and if it has a lot of scale, the energy costs to operate it could be through the roof.
Jessie
January 13, 2020 at 3:38 PM
Hi, Just moving to Sun City, AZ from out of state and never had to deal with water such as what we have here. Here's my goal: protect our appliances and have drinkable, clean and non-smelly or weird tasting water in the house from every tap if possible including the refrigerator for water and ice. I'd like it to be as fuss-free as possible and, of course, affordable but willing to spend what we need to in order to have a simple system to take care of. What piece or pieces of equipment do we need? Of course, Nuvo was recommended already but I'm clearly averse to that system after reading all these posts. Can you tell me what the best and easiest way to accomplish this might be and what kind of price we would be talking? Does it involve a water softener, filters, etc., to get whole-house good water? More detail would be greatly appreciated so I can be specific with my needs when talking to whomever would be installing all this (and can any plumber install what you'll recommend or do I need someone else to do that also?). Thanks so much! Also, we haven't lived here long enough to know about the soap issues, bad skin, difficult spots, etc., but will care about that also.